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Lewis: Financial Services Appropriations bill needs “more frugality, less spending”


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, Jun 17, 2008 -

 Lewis: Financial Services Appropriations bill needs “more frugality, less spending”

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The House Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial Services today approved the Fiscal Year 2009 funding bill for the Department of Treasury, the Judiciary, the Executive Office of the President, and other independent federal agencies.

The legislation totals $22.39 billion, which is $153 million over the President’s request and $1.8 billion over last year’s level.

“Frankly, this bill needs more frugality, less spending, and a firmer hand with the taxpayers’ money,” House Appropriations Ranking Republican Jerry Lewis said. “While many of these programs are essential to maintaining a working federal government, we must be more mindful of our overall spending and not simply fully fund programs just because the money is available.”

The legislation approved today includes $12.58 billion for the Treasury Department, which is $580 million over last year’s level and $115 million over the President’s request. Independent federal agencies received a collective total of $3.5 billion, which is $980 million over last year’s level and $210 million over the request. The federal payment to the District of C olumbia also received a big boost to the tune of $712 million which is $102 million more than last year.

In addition, the legislation contains several controversial policy provisions, including loosening the ban on travel to Cuba, prohibiting the implementation of new F C C media ownership rules, and restricting public-private competition at government agencies. The bill also does not contain a reauthorization of the District of Columbia school voucher programs.

“I am disappointed with all of the controversial policy changes and lack of adequate spending restraint in this bill,” Lewis said. “This legislation needs some work, but I am optimistic that its flaws can be worked out as we go forward with a fair, traditional appropriations process that includes an open rule on the House floor,” he continued.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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