Appropriations Committee Releases Fiscal Year 2022 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Funding Bill

July 11, 2021
Press Release
Legislation creates jobs, invests in education, child care, and research, bolsters public health infrastructure, and advances equal treatment for women

The House Appropriations Committee today released the draft fiscal year 2022 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies funding bill, which will be considered in subcommittee tomorrow. The legislation funds agencies and programs in the Departments of Health and Human Services, Labor, and Education.

For 2022, the bill provides $253.8 billion, an increase of $55.2 billion – 28 percent – above 2021. With this historic increase, the legislation:

  • Creates and sustains good-paying American jobs through investments in job training, apprenticeship programs, and worker protection
  • Grows opportunity with transformative investments in education, including record funding for high-poverty schools and students with disabilities, and strong increases for programs that expand access to post-secondary education
  • Supports middle class and working families with increased funding for child care and development programs, Head Start, and preschool development grants
  • Strengthens lifesaving biomedical research with increased funding for the National Institutes of Health, including funding to establish the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health
  • Bolsters our public health infrastructure with more resources for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and for states and local governments to strengthen infrastructure and capacity
  • Addresses our nation’s most urgent health crises, including maternal health, mental health, gun violence, and opioid abuse, while making strides to reduce persistent and unacceptable health disparities
  • Advances equal treatment for women by increasing funding for the range of health services, including family planning, covered by Title X and repealing the discriminatory Hyde Amendment

“Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, hardworking middle class families and people struggling to make it into the middle class were already having a hard time getting the support they needed to lead healthy, happy, and productive lives. Child care is widely inaccessible. Students face considerable barriers to an affordable, high-quality education. Women are all too often unable to obtain the life-saving medical treatment they need. And our public health infrastructure is in dire need of an update. The COVID-19 pandemic further exacerbated these already existing challenges,” Appropriations Committee Chair Rosa DeLauro (D-CT-03) said.  “I am proud that the funding in the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education bill will lift up struggling families, support the vulnerable, and help prepare our nation for future challenges. This bill touches people at every stage of their lives, and the massive funding increase will create a society that provides people with the help they so desperately need. With this funding, House Democrats are ensuring the American people and our public health system is equipped with the resources needed to allow our communities to thrive.” 

A summary of the draft fiscal year 2022 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies bill is below. The text of the draft bill is here. The subcommittee markup will be webcast live and linked from https://appropriations.house.gov/events/markups.
 

Bill Summary:

Department of Labor (DOL) The bill provides a total of $14.7 billion in discretionary appropriations for DOL, an increase of $2.2 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $400 million above the President’s budget request.  Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • $11.6 billion for the Employment and Training Administration, an increase of $1.6 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $371.2 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
    • $3.1 billion for Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act State Grants, an increase of $250 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $76.2 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $96.7 million for Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers, an increase of $2.8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
    • $150 million for the Reintegration of Ex-Offenders, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
    • $285 million for Registered Apprenticeships, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
    • $145 million for YouthBuild, an increase of $48.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
    • $100 million, an increase of $55 million over the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request, to continue and expand Strengthening Community College Training Grants to help meet local and regional labor market demand for a skilled workforce by providing training to workers in in-demand industries at community colleges and four-year partners.
    • $100 million to support communities experiencing dislocations related to fossil fuel and energy production.
    • $50 million for National Youth Employment Program to support summer and year-round employment for youth.
    • $20 million for Veterans Clean Energy Training to prepare veterans and their spouses for employment in clean energy.
    • $1.83 billion for Job Corps, an increase of $81.4 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $75.3 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $450 million for the Senior Community Service Employment for Older Americans Program, an increase of $45 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
    • $3.1 billion for operation of the Unemployment Insurance program, an increase of $559.4 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request. The bill also includes $155 million in emergency contingency funding to help States address spikes in unemployment claims.
    • $94.1 million for Foreign Labor Certification, an increase of $16.3 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $4.5 million above the President’s budget request. Funds will help support Federal oversight and enforcement of regulations and assist States in reviewing and conducting oversight of processing applications.
  • $2.1 billion for Worker Protection Agencies, an increase of $305 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $1 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
    • $300 million for the Wage and Hour Division, an increase of $54 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $24 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $692 million for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $27 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $141 million for the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, an increase of $35 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
    • $218 million for the Employee Benefits Security Administration, an increase of $38 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
  • $136 million for the Bureau of International Labor Affairs, an increase of $40 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $12 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $25 million for the Women’s Bureau, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $5 million above the President’s budget request. 
  • $68 million for the Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
     

Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) – The bill provides a total of $119.8 billion for HHS, an increase of $22.9 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $129 million below the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • National Institutes of Health (NIH) – The bill provides a total of $49 billion for NIH, an increase of $6.5 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • The bill includes $3 billion to establish the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H) to accelerate the pace of scientific breakthroughs for diseases such as ALS, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, and cancer.
    • The bill also includes an increase of $3.5 billion for existing NIH Institutes and Centers, which supports an increase of no less than 5 percent for each Institute and Center to support a wide range of biomedical and behavioral research, as well as targeted investments in several high-priority areas, including:
      • $7 billion, an increase of $432 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the National Cancer Institute, including $194 million for the Cancer Moonshot;
      • $541 million, an increase of $41 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the All of Us Precision Medicine Initiative;
      • $612 million, an increase of $52 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the BRAIN Initiative;
      • An increase of $627 million for research related to opioids, stimulants, and pain/pain management;
      • An increase of $330 million for health disparities research;
      • An increase of $30 million for the Implementing a Maternal Health and Pregnancy Outcomes Vision for Everyone (IMPROVE) initiative, to support research on maternal morbidity and mortality;
      • $25 million, an increase of $12.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for firearm injury and mortality prevention research;
      • $250 million, an increase of $30 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Universal Flu Vaccine Research;
      • $3.3 billion, an increase of $200 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for HIV/AIDS research, including an increase of $10 million for the Centers for AIDS Research as part of the Ending the HIV Epidemic Initiative;
      • $3.4 billion, an increase of $200 million above the FY 2021 enacted level for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias research;
      • $110 million, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for research on the impacts of climate change on human health;
      • $80 million, an increase of $15 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the INCLUDE Down syndrome research initiative;
      • $61 million, an increase of $18 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Office of Research on Women’s Health;
      • $50 million, an increase of $20 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research;
      • Increased investments in increasing diversity in the biomedical research workforce, including $88 million, an increase of $8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Research Centers in Minority Institutions, an increase of $20 million for research workforce programs, and an increase of $16 million to strengthen the Office of the CIO for Scientific Workforce Diversity;
      • $616 million, an increase of $29 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Clinical and Translational Science Awards;
      • $415 million, an increase of $18 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Institutional Development Awards;
      • An increase of $40 million for targeted research related to the impact of COVID-19 on children and on mental health;
      • $50 million to support rapid vaccine development platforms for emerging infectious diseases;
      • $12 million, an increase of $6 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Consortium of Food Allergy Research; and
      • An increase of $100 million to strengthen cybersecurity at NIH.
         
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – The bill includes a total of $10.6 billion for CDC, an increase of $2.7 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $1 billion above the President’s budget request. This includes $903 million in transfers from the Prevention and Public Health Fund.
     
  • The bill includes significant investments in our nation’s public health infrastructure including:
    • $1 billion in a new, flexible funding stream for public health infrastructure and capacity nationwide.
    • $150 million, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to modernize public health data surveillance and analytics at CDC and State and local health departments.
    • $106 million, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, in public health workforce initiatives.
    • $843 million, an increase of $250 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for global health.
    • $190 million, an increase of $15 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the National Center for Health Statistics.
    • $715 million, an increase of $20 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for public health emergency preparedness cooperative agreements.
       
  • The bill provides increases for numerous public health efforts, including:
    • $25 million, an increase of $12.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for firearm injury and mortality prevention research.
    • $74 million, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the only Federal program addressing the nation’s racial and ethnic health disparities, Racial and Ethnic Approach to Community Health (REACH), including $27 million, an increase of $5 million, for Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country.
    • $119 million, an increase $56 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for safe motherhood.
    • $110 million, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the health impacts of climate change.
    • $153 million, an increase of $150 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for social determinates of health.
    • $275 million, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Ending the HIV Initiative.
    • $115 million, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for community and youth violence prevention.
    • $663 million, an increase of $188 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for opioid overdose prevention and surveillance.
    • $75 million, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for food safety.
    • $250 million, an increase of $12.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to address tobacco and e-cigarettes.
       
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) – The bill funds SAMHSA at $9.16 billion – an increase of $3.14 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level. SAMHSA funding includes:
    • Mental Health: $3.16 billion, an increase of $1.36 billion over the FY 2021 enacted level, including an $825 million increase to the Mental Health Block Grant (MHBG), making investments across the behavioral health continuum to support prevention, screening, treatment, and other services.
    • Mental health resources for children and youth: $155 million for Project AWARE, an increase of $48.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level; $100 million for the National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative, an increase of $28 million above the FY 2021 enacted level; $25 million for Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health, an increase of $17 million above the FY 2021 enacted level; and $150 million for the Children’s Mental Health program, an increase of $25 million over the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • Suicide prevention: $26.2 million for the Zero Suicide program, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level; and $113.6 million for the Suicide Lifeline, an increase of $89.6 million above the FY 2021 enacted level to support the implementation of the Lifeline’s new 988 number.
    • Increases the mental health crisis systems set-aside in the MHBG to 10 percent.
    • Creates a new 10 percent set-aside within the MHBG to support prevention and early intervention.
    • Creates a new Mental Health Crisis Response Partnership Pilot Program, which will provide $100 million to help communities create mobile crisis response teams.
    • Substance use treatment: $5.5 billion, an increase of $1.6 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level, including continued funding for opioid prevention and treatment, recovery, and tribal-focused treatment efforts. This includes $2.8 billion, an increase of $1 billion over the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant (SABG); $2 billion for State Opioid Response Grants, an increase of $500 million over the FY 2021 enacted level; and $136.5 million, an increase of $56.5 million, for Medication Assisted Treatment.
    • Creates a new 10 percent set-aside within the SABG to support recovery services.
    • Substance abuse prevention: $243.5 million, an increase of $35 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
       
  • Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) – The bill includes $9.1 billion for HRSA, an increase of $1.6 billion above the 2021 enacted level and $910 million above the President’s budget request. The amount includes:
    • $1.8 billion, an increase of $148 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Health Centers program, including $50 million, an increase of $45 million, to support school-based health centers, and $25 million to establish the Alcee Hastings Cancer Screening Program;
    • $2.7 billion, an increase of $231 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Ryan White HIV/AIDS program;
    • $152 million, an increase of $50 million, in Health Centers and $190 million, an increase of $85 million, in the Ryan White HIV/AIDS program for the Ending the HIV Epidemic Initiative;
    • $1.6 billion, an increase of $341 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for HRSA’s Bureau of Health Professions programs to support health workforce development;
    • $1.2 billion, an increase of $214 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for programs to improve maternal and child health, including:
      • $869 million, an increase of $156 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Maternal and Child Health Block Grant;
      • $14 million, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Alliance for Maternal Health Safety Bundles;
      • $53 million, an increase of $30 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for State Maternal Health Innovation Grants;
      • $5 million, an increase of $2 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Maternal Mental Health Hotline;
      • $25 million in new funding for the Pregnancy Medical Home Demonstration; and
      • $10 million, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Screening and Treatment for Maternal Depression and Related Disorders.
    • $400 million, an increase of $214 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Rural Health Programs, including $79 million, an increase of $23 million, to support rural hospitals and $10 million, an increase of $5 million for the Rural Maternity and Obstetrics Management Strategies (RMOMS) program; and
    • $400 million, an increase of $113.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $60 million above the President’s budget request, for the Title X Family Planning program.
       
  • Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) – The bill provides $380 million for AHRQ, an increase of $42 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
     
  • Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) – The bill provides $4.3 billion for CMS administrative expenses, an increase of $341 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request. This funding level includes an increase of $74.8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level for State Survey and Certification activities to strengthen improvement efforts, increase health and safety inspections of nursing home facilities, and ensure that long-term care and other facilities have proper infection controls in place.
     
  • Administration for Children and Families (ACF) – The bill provides $31.3 billion in discretionary funding for ACF, an increase of $6.6 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $680 million above the President’s budget request.
    • Early childhood education programs receive an increase of $3.1 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level:
  • $7.4 billion for the Child Care and Development Block Grant, an increase of $1.5 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level;
  • $12.2 billion for Head Start, an increase of $1.4 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level; and
  • $450 million for Preschool Development Grants, an increase of $175 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.  
    • $3.9 billion for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, an increase of $150 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • $800 million for the Community Services Block Grant, an increase of $55 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • $257 million for Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) programs, an increase of $71 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • $463 million for Family Violence and Prevention Services Act (FVPSA) programs, an increase of $281 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • $26 million for the Domestic Violence Hotline, an increase of $13 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.

 

  • Administration for Community Living (ACL) – The bill funds ACL at $3.1 billion, an increase of $846 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $96 million above the President’s budget request. This amount includes:
    • $1.4 billion for Senior Nutrition programs, an increase of $436 million above the FY 2021 enacted level;
    • $551 million for Home and Community-based Supportive Services, an increase of $158 million above the FY 2021 enacted level;
    • $266 million for Family and Native American Caregivers Services, an increase of $66 million above the FY 2021 enacted level;
    • $70 million for Grants for Native Americans, an increase of $35 million above the FY 2021 enacted level; and
    • $14.2 million for the Lifespan Respite Program, an increase of $7.1 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.

 

  • Office of the Secretary—General Departmental Management – The bill provides $658 million, an increase of $106 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. The amount includes:
    • $130 million for the Teen Pregnancy Prevention program, an increase of $29 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • $76 million for the Office of Minority Health, an increase of $14 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $14 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $58 million for the Minority HIV/AIDS Initiative, an increase of $3 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $3 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $42 million for the Office on Women’s Health, an increase of $7 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $7 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $5 million for KidneyX, equal to the FY 2021 enacted level, for a public-private partnership to accelerate the development and adoption of novel therapies and technologies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of kidney diseases.
    • No funding for abstinence-only education.

 

  • Office of the Secretary—Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund (PHSSEF) – The bill provides $3.5 billion for PHSSEF, an increase of $671 million above the FY 2020 level and $5 million below the President’s budget request.
  • The bill provides funding to improve the nation’s preparedness for public health emergencies, including:
  • $335 million, an increase of $48 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for pandemic influenza.
  • $823 million, an increase of $227 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA).
  • $770 million, equal to the President’s budget request, for Project BioShield.
  • $905 million, an increase of $200 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Strategic National Stockpile.
  • $240 million, an increase of $8.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Hospital Preparedness Program formula grants.
  • $31 million, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to expand the number of Regional Ebola and Other Special Pathogen Treatment Centers.

 

Department of Education (ED) – The bill provides a total of $102.8 billion in discretionary appropriations for ED, an increase of $29.3 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:

 

  • K-12 Education, including Individuals with Disabilities Education Act programs—The bill provides $65.6 billion, an increase of $25 billion over the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill provides:
  • $36 billion for Title I Grants to Local Educational Agencies, an increase of $19.5 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level.
  • $17.2 billion for Special Education, an increase of $3.1 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $7 million above the President’s budget request. The amount includes:
    • $15.5 billion for Part B Grants to States, an increase of $2.6 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request, and
    • $29 million for Special Olympics education programs, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request. 
  • $1 billion for English Language Acquisition, an increase of $203 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $83 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $2.3 billion for Supporting Effective Instruction State Grants (Title II-A), an increase of $150 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $145 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $1.3 billion for Student Support and Academic Enrichment State Grants, an increase of $85 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
  • $1.4 billion for Nita M. Lowey 21st Century Community Learning Centers, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $50 million above the President’s budget request.
  • Continued support for a Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) Initiative to support SEL and “whole child” approaches to education. Within this amount, the bill provides:
    • $112 million, an increase of $45 million over the FY 2021 enacted level, for grants for evidence-based, field-initiated innovations that address student social, emotional, and cognitive needs within the Education Innovation and Research program;
    • $90 million, an increase of $10 million over the FY21 enacted level, for the Supporting Effective Educator Development (SEED) program with a priority for teacher professional development and pathways into teaching that provide a strong foundation in child development and learning, including skills for implementing SEL strategies;
    • $1 billion within School Safety National Activities for Mental Health Services Professional Demonstration Grants and School-Based Mental Health Services Grants to help LEAs directly increase the number of mental health and child development experts in schools; and
    • $443 million, an increase of $413 million over the FY 2021 enacted level, for Full-Service Community Schools to provide comprehensive services and expand evidence-based models that meet the holistic needs of children, families, and communities.

 

  • Career, Technical and Adult Education—The bill provides $2.2 billion for Career, Technical and Adult Education, an increase of $208 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $55 million above the President’s budget request. This amount includes:
    • $1.38 billion for CTE State Grants, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $30 million above the President’s budget request, and
    • $738.7 million for Adult Education State Grants, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $25 million above the President’s budget request.

 

  • Student Financial Assistance— The bill provides $27.2 billion for Federal student aid programs, an increase of $2.64 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $358 million below the President’s budget request.  Within this amount, the bill provides:
    • $6,895 for the maximum Pell Grant, an increase of $400 above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s discretionary budget request. 
    • $1.03 billion for the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant program, an increase of $148 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
    • $1.43 billion for Federal Work Study, an increase of $244 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.

 

  • Higher Education— The bill provides $3.43 billion for higher education programs, an increase of $889 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $122 million above the President’s budget request. 
    • Within this amount, the bill provides $1.13 billion, an increase of $345 million over the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request, to assist primarily Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) in the Aid for Institutional Development account, including:
      • $402.6 million for Historically Black Colleges and Universities, an increase of $65 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
      • $236.7 million for Hispanic Serving Institutions, an increase of $88 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget.
      • $53 million for Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities, an increase of $15 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
    • The bill also provides investments in the following higher education programs:
      • $1.3 billion for Federal TRIO programs, an increase of $200.8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
      • $408 million for GEAR UP, an increase of $40 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
      • $132 million for Teacher Quality Partnerships, an increase of $80 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
      • $95 million for the Child Care Access Means Parents in School, an increase of $40 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
      • $168 million for the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, an increase of $127 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $92 million above the President’s budget request. This amount includes:
        • $15 million to continue the Centers of Excellence for Veteran Student Success Program to provide student veterans a one-stop-shop for academic support, networking opportunities, peer mentorship, financing assistance, counseling, and career services.
        • $12 million to continue the Open Textbook Pilot program to support the creation and expand the sustainable use of quality open college textbooks.
        • $10 million to promote the study of modeling and simulation at institutions of higher education, specifically to promote the use of technology in such study through the creation of accurate models that can simulate processes or recreate real life.
        • $8 million for a Basic Needs Grants pilot to help support college students achieve academic success by meeting their basic needs, such as housing, food, transportation, and access to physical and mental health.
        • $5 million for Menstrual Products Programs to support the students and provide free menstrual products on college campuses.
        • $5 million for the Center of Excellence in Spatial Computing program to help meet the growing need for a spatial computing workforce.
        • $5 million for the Distributed Higher Education Digital Infrastructure Pilot to establish a pilot program supporting a collaboration between colleges with established remote learning infrastructure and Minority Serving Institutions.
        • $1 million for Transitioning Gang-Involved Youth to Higher Education to help gang-involved youth pursue higher education.

 

Related Agencies –

  • $1.3 billion for the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), an increase of $194 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $105 million above the President’s budget request.
  • Within the total amount, the bill includes:
    • $601 million for AmeriCorps State and National Grants, an increase of $146 million over the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • $245 million for SeniorCorps programs, an increase of $20 million over the FY 2021 enacted level. 
  • $565 million for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), in 2024 advance funding, an increase of $90 million above the FY 2023 enacted level and the President’s budget request.  In addition, the bill includes $20 million for the interconnection system and system wide infrastructure, equal to the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request. 
  • $282 million for the Institute of Museum and Library Services, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $17 million above the President’s budget request. 
  • $317 million for the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), an increase of $43 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $15 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes $1 million and new bill language for the NLRB to establish and administer a process for electronic voting.
  • $14.1 billion for the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) operating expenses, an increase of $1.1 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level.

 

Policy Provisions

 

Defending Reproductive Health Care

  • Access to Reproductive Health Care—The bill eliminates the Hyde and Weldon amendments, long-standing discriminatory policy which denied low-income women their legal right to an abortion.
  • Title X Family Planning—The bill includes language consistent with the Administration’s proposed new Title X rule, which will help restore grant funding to Planned Parenthood and other health clinics that offer the full range of reproductive health services.

 

Protecting Migrants

  • Influx Shelters—The bill limits funds from being used to house unaccompanied children in the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement in unlicensed facilities that do not come into compliance with Flores Settlement Agreement requirements and meet monitoring and compliance requirements. 
  • Congressional Oversight—The bill includes a modification of the FY 2021 enacted provision relating to Members of Congress and oversight of facilities responsible for the care of unaccompanied children.
  • Confidentiality of Information and Counseling Sessions—The bill protects the confidentiality of information collected from unaccompanied children during case management, clinical or counselling sessions, and prohibits the sharing of information provided by unaccompanied children for use in immigration enforcement or removal proceedings.

 

Protecting Workers Rights

  • Merit Staffing—The bill includes a new provision prohibiting the use of funds to implement a final rule that would privatize job search functions and other essential services offered through the Employment Service system.
  • Apprenticeships—The bill includes a new provision prohibiting implementation of the IRAP final rule
  • H-2B—The bill includes new provisions related to the H-2B program intended to protect American and temporary workers and hold bad actors accountable.

 

Protecting Civil Rights

  • Preventing Discrimination in Foster Care—The bill includes a new provision prohibiting funds from being awarded to a foster care organization that does not comply with nondiscrimination regulations related to age, disability, sex, race, color, national origin, religion, gender identity, or sexual orientation.

 

Expanding Opportunity and Ensuring Accountability in Education

  • Pell for Dreamers—The bill includes new language allowing DREAMERs and students with temporary protected status to be eligible for Pell Grants, as well as other categories of student financial assistance, including Federal student loans.
  • For-Profit College Accountability—The bill includes new language requiring for-profit colleges to derive more of their revenue from non-Federal sources.
  • For-Profit Entities—The bill includes new language preventing Federal funds from being awarded to charter schools run by for-profit entities.

 

Supporting People with Disabilities

  • Administrative Law Judges—The bill includes a provision prohibiting the Social Security Administration from implementing or enforcing a rule that replaces an individual’s right to appeal their denied application for Social Security or SSI benefits before an independent administrative law judge at a hearing with an appeal before an SSA staff attorney.

 

Helping Reduce Injection-Related Infections to Save Lives

  • Syringe Exchange—The bill removes a longstanding general provision that prohibited federal funds from being used to purchase syringes as part of a public health campaign to provide services to individuals involved in injection drug use.
117th Congress