Appropriations Committee Releases Fiscal Year 2022 State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Funding Bill

June 27, 2021
Press Release
Legislation supports the displaced and vulnerable, rebuilds public health infrastructure, confronts climate change, advances women’s rights and promotes democracy

The House Appropriations Committee today released the fiscal year 2022 State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations bill, which will be considered in subcommittee tomorrow. The legislation funds U.S. diplomatic, development, and foreign policy agencies and programs, including the Department of State, the United States Agency for International Development, and the U.S. Mission to the United Nations. 

In total, the bill provides $62.24 billion, which is $6.737 billion above 2021 – an increase of 12.1 percent. The legislation:

  • Supports the world’s most vulnerable with foreign assistance to meet urgent humanitarian needs, many of which have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Rebuilds the global public health infrastructure with a dramatic increase in funding for global health security to confront the current COVID-19 pandemic and prevent future pandemics
  • Confronts climate change with funding for global efforts to reduce emissions, including the Green Climate Fund
  • Advances women’s rights by increasing funding for family planning, increasing United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) funding, and repealing restrictions on safe and legal abortion
  • Promotes democracy with funding to support allies and partners of the United States, particularly to counter growing Chinese influence

“This bill demonstrates the resurgence of American leadership in the world at a time when it is critically needed,” said State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Chair Barbara Lee (D-CA-13).  It addresses urgent global health and humanitarian needs, provides strong funding to address the climate crisis and advance gender equity.  Through funding for tackling hunger, supporting education, clean water and energy, the bill shows our commitment to advancing the United Nation’s Sustainable Development goals, including addressing global poverty and reducing inequalities. Importantly, this bill also includes new provisions to advance the critical need for our foreign policy workforce to reflect the diversity of our nation.”

“While COVID-19 cases have sharply declined in the United States, the coronavirus pandemic is far from over across the globe, with 370,000 new cases and over 8,000 new deaths per day. As new variants develop and spread, we must continue to work across countries and borders to put an end to this pandemic while ensuring we are prepared to prevent the pandemics of the future,” Appropriations Committee Chair Rosa DeLauro (D-CT-03) said. “The substantial global health investments in this legislation will ensure that America leads the way in crushing the current pandemic and bolstering detection and response to prevent future pandemics.”

A summary of the draft fiscal year 2022 State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs bill is below. The text of the draft bill is here. The subcommittee markup will be webcast live and linked from https://appropriations.house.gov/events/markups.
 

Bill Summary:
 

  • Recommends over $3 billion to address the Climate Crisis and other environmental programs, including $1.6 billion for the Green Climate Fund, the first direct appropriation for the Fund. 
    • These needed investments will assist the millions of people at greater risk of hunger, disease and displacement due to climate change  including by conserving, restoring, and reforesting 20 million hectares by 2025, and rapidly accelerating the transition to net-zero emissions in at least 20 partner countries;
  • Invests in Global Health and the Prevention of Future Pandemics by including $10.6 billion to support the health of families and communities around the world, a $1.445 billion increase over FY2021 enacted; and makes a substantial investment of $1 billion, an increase of $810 million, in global health security to prevent future pandemics through both bilateral and multilateral mechanisms;
    • These investments will bolster the surveillance, detection and response capabilities of countries around the world and reinforce the governance and accountability of the International Health Regulation to protect against another pandemic.
  • Supports women’s health globally by: 1) substantially increasing funding for bilateral family planning to $760 million (+$185 million above the prior year); 2) directing a U.S. contribution for UNFPA of $70 million (+$37.5million above the prior year); 3) removing the Helms amendment restrictions that have prohibited safe abortion and health care services for poor and vulnerable women in low-income countries; and 4) permanently repealing the Global Gag Rule on non-governmental organizations that receive U.S. assistance. 
    • These policy changes and funding increases will help the 218 million women worldwide who have an unmet need for contraception and help prevent the estimated 299,000 women who die annually of pregnancy-related causes largely because they cannot access the care they need.
  • Increases humanitarian assistance by $700 million to address the historic levels of global displacement and humanitarian need resulting from natural disasters, conflict, and the pandemic and to rebuild the U.S. Refugee Admissions program.
    • This will maintain United States leadership to cope with the record-setting 235 million people worldwide (nearly 1 in 33) in need of humanitarian aid and protection.
  • Provides over $1.6 billion to promote a free and open Indo-Pacific and help counter the growing influence of the People’s Republic of China in developing countries. 
  • Reaffirms strong support for UN organizations and restoring American leadership on the world stage, including full funding for the UN regular budget and peacekeeping (including payment of arrears), UNRWA, UNFPA, and the WHO.
  • Increases resources to the Department of the Treasury in order to provide economic relief to vulnerable low-income countries recovering from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic through both bilateral and multilateral programs.
  • Provides economic support and flexibility through the Export-Import Bank to U.S. companies impacted by the pandemic in addition to helping them better compete globally.
     

Overall funding:

State Department Operations and Related Agencies – The bill contains a total of $18.2 billion for the operational costs of the State Department and related agencies, as well as diplomacy efforts to enhance peace and stability around the globe and provides the authority for the State Department to exceed the cap on U.S. peacekeeping contributions.  The bill also includes a total of $325 million to pay arrears from prior year peacekeeping assessments.

Within this amount, the legislation provides $6.1 billion for embassy security, the same as the fiscal year 2021 enacted level. These funds will address needs at more than 275 diplomatic facilities overseas, including facility upgrades and security personnel.

United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Operations – The bill contains $1.79 billion for USAID and the USAID Office of Inspector General – an increase of $79 million from the fiscal year 2021 enacted level. The legislation increases diversity and inclusion initiatives in addition to supporting increased personnel on global health security.

Bilateral Economic and Global Health Assistance – The bill contains a total of $29.625 billion for bilateral economic assistance to foreign countries – an increase of $3.14 billion from the fiscal year 2021 enacted level.   Within this amount, programs that support development assistance, global health, and humanitarian assistance are prioritized.  In addition, the bill includes $6.410 billion to fight HIV/AIDS around the globe.

International Security Assistance – The bill provides a total of $9.034 billion for international security assistance – an increase of $30 million from the fiscal year 2021 enacted level.  Funds are included for international narcotics control and law enforcement activities, antiterrorism programs, nonproliferation programs, peacekeeping operations, and other critical international security efforts.  The bill also provides funding to fight terrorist financing networks and bolsters border and airport security.

In addition, the legislation provides security assistance to key allies and partners.  The bill fully funds the $3.3 billion commitment to Israel’s security, and it maintains strong support for Foreign Military Financing Program assistance for Ukraine, Georgia, Egypt, Jordan, and Tunisia. 

Multilateral Assistance – The bill provides $4.1 billion for assistance to foreign countries through international organizations and banks – an increase of $2.06 billion from the fiscal year 2021 enacted level.  The bill fully provides for our assessed Contributions to International Organizations and continues our contributions to international financial institutions such as the World Bank’s International Development Association as well as to other multilateral institutions, including the Global Environment Facility and the International Fund for Agricultural Development, which promote environment and food security initiatives respectively. Further, the bill provides a new contribution to the International Monetary Fund for the Poverty Reduction and Growth Trust to help low-income countries respond to the economic impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Export and Investment Assistance – The bill provides $805.8 million in new budget authority between Export-Import Bank (EXIM) and the United States International Development Finance Corporation (DFC).   The bill provides $114 million for administrative expenses for the EXIM, an increase of $4 million above FY 2021 enacted, and an additional $5 million for the Program Budget Appropriations account, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to cover subsidy costs to better position American companies to compete globally. $6.5 million is also provided for the EXIM Office of Inspector General.

The bill also provides $598 million for the DFC, an increase of $29 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level, to support administrative expenses to meet the DFC’s expanding portfolio and monitoring and evaluation requirements. In addition, $2.8 million is provided for the DFC Office of Inspector General, an increase of $800,000 above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level. The bill also provides $79.5 million for the United States Trade and Development Agency, same as the fiscal year 2021 enacted level.

 

Funding for critical programs:

Family Planning & UNFPA:

  • $760 million for family planning, $185 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $176.3 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $70 million for UNFPA - $37.5 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $14 million above the President’s budget request.
     

President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), including the Global Fund:

  • $6.08 billion for PEPFAR, including $1.56 billion for the Global Fund – $150 million more than the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
     

Other Global Health Programs:

  • $4.56 billion for programs to improve maternal and child health and fight infectious diseases, $1.3 billion above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $440 million above the President’s budget request.  Includes $1 billion for Global Health Security, an $810 million increase above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level. 
     

Human Rights of All People including LGBTQI+ Communities:

  • $15 million for the Global Equality Fund - $5 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level.
  • $10 million for the Protection of LGBTQI+ Persons, USAID - $4 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level.
  • $500,000 for the Special Envoy for the Human Rights of LGBTI Persons – same as the fiscal year 2021 enacted level.
  • $19 million for disability rights - $3.5 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level.
     

International Basic Education:

  • $950 million for basic education – the same as the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $ 267.4 million above the President’s budget request. This includes $150 million for multilateral partnerships in education and requires not less than $150 million be spent on girl’s education in areas of conflict.
     

Humanitarian Assistance:

  • $8.53 billion for humanitarian assistance under the accounts Migration & Refugee Assistance (MRA), U.S. Emergency Refugee & Migration Assistance (ERMA), and International Disaster Assistance (IDA) – the same as the President’s budget request and $700 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level.
     

Educational and Cultural Exchange (ECE) Programs

  • $750 million for exchange programs - $9.7 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $8.7 million above the President’s budget request.
     

Biodiversity, Wildlife Trafficking, & Climate Initiatives:

  • $400 million for biodiversity, $80 million more than the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $182.3 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $125 million for wildlife trafficking, $24.3 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $32.3 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $149.3 million for the Global Environment Facility, of which $12.7 million is for unmet commitments -- $9.7 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
  • $1.6 billion for the Green Climate Fund, $1.6 billion above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $350 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $200 million for the Clean Technology Fund, $200 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $100 million below the President’s budget request.
     

Other Environment Programs:

  • $202.5 million for sustainable landscapes, $67.5 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $29.8 million below the President’s budget request.
  • $294.2 million for adaptation programs, $117.2 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and
  • $179 million for renewable energy programs, same as the fiscal year 2020 enacted level and not included in the President’s budget request.
     

Democracy Programs & National Endowment for Democracy (NED):

  • $2.517 billion for democracy programs, $100 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $283 million below the President’s budget request.
  • $300 million for the NED, same as the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
  • $290.7 million for Democracy Fund (DF), of which $190.45 million is for the State Department and $100.25 million for USAID, same as the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request
     

Assessed & voluntary contributions for U.N. peacekeeping activities:

  • $1.929 billion for Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities (CIPA), $472.2 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.
  • $460.8 million for Peacekeeping Operations (PKO), $20 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $8.7 million below the President’s budget request.
     

Assessed & voluntary contributions to international organizations:

  • $1.663 billion to fully fund our assessed Contributions to International Organizations (CIO), including for human rights-related arrears.
  • $477.1 million for International Organizations & Programs (IO&P) – $89.6 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $20 million above the President’s budget request.
    • Includes increases for 2 critical partners in the global response to climate change – the Montreal Protocol Multilateral Fund and the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change/UN Framework Convention on Climate Change
       

Peace Corps

  • $430.5 million for Peace Corps – $20 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
     

The Asia Foundation:

  • $20 million for the Asia Foundation – same as the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and President’s budget request.
     

East-West Center:

  • $19.7 million for the East-West Center - same as the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and President’s budget request.
     

Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC):

  • $912 million for MCC – same as the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
     

U.S. International Development Finance Corporation (DFC):

  • $598 million, of which $148 million is for administrative expenses and $450 million is for programs such as equity financing, credit subsidy, and technical assistance. The House mark is $29 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and same as the President’s budget request.
  • $2.8 million for the DFC IG – $800,000 above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and same as the President’s budget request.
     

The Inter-American Foundation:

  • $44.5 million for the IAF, which is $6.5 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level.
     

U.S. African Development Foundation:

  • $43 million for the USADF, which is $10 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level.

 

Support for U.S. allies, partners, and programs including:

(amounts are included in account totals above)

  • Israel:  $3.3 billion, fulfilling the MOU.
  • Jordan:  $1.52 billion, fulfilling the MOU.
  • Egypt: $1.3 billion for security assistance to Egypt, with additional governance and human rights reporting requirements, including more stringent conditions on political prisoners and providing American citizens injured in Egypt with commensurate compensation.
  • Assistance for programs in the West Bank and Gaza: Not less than $225 million under Economic Support Fund for the humanitarian and development needs of the Palestinian people in the West Bank and Gaza, which is $150 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $40 million above the President’s budget request.
  • Assistance for Eastern Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia: $788.9 million, which is $18.5 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level.
  • Central America: $860.6 million for the countries of Central America, including $60 million to combat crime, corruption, impunity, advance human rights, and hold local governments accountable.
  • The Caribbean: Not less than $80 million for the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative, not less than $15 million for strengthening resilience to natural disaster; and not less than $10 million for support of projects to promote inclusive economic growth in the region.
  • Colombia: $461.4 million, including $51 million for rule of law and human rights activities.
  • Democracy and the rule of law in Venezuela: Not less than $50 million
  • Countering Russian Influence Fund: $290 million.
  • Tibet:  $17 million and $1 million for the Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues.
  • The Nita M. Lowey Middle East Partnership for Peace Act: $50 million to support the 2nd year of implementation, as authorized.

 

Important policy provisions:

Promotes Diversity and Inclusion

  • The bill includes increased funding, authority, and guidance to equip the Secretary of State and USAID Administrator to increase diversity and inclusion in the nation’s diplomatic and development workforce.
     

Emphasizes gender equality:

  • The bill includes $200 million for the Gender Equity and Equality Action Fund, $50 million to support women’s leadership, $200 million to prevent and respond to gender-based violence, $17 million to address women at risk of violent extremism and $150 million to support the Women, Peace and Security Strategy.
     

Lautenberg Amendment:

  • The bill includes the "Lautenberg Amendment," which protects refugee eligibility for historically persecuted religious minorities.
     

Afghan Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) Program:

  • The bill includes authority and direction for the Secretary of State to use the funding in this legislation to implement the Afghan Allies Protection Act and expedite the adjudication of Afghan Special Immigrant (SIV) cases.  
117th Congress