Appropriations Committee Releases Fiscal Year 2023 Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies Funding Bill

June 20, 2022
Press Release
Legislation lowers costs for working families, creates good-paying jobs, invests in clean energy, and rebuilds water infrastructure

WASHINGTON — The House Appropriations Committee today released the draft fiscal year 2023 Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies funding bill, which will be considered in subcommittee tomorrow. The legislation funds agencies and programs in the Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Reclamation, and several independent agencies. 

For 2023, the Energy and Water bill provides $56.275 billion, an increase of $3.4 billion above the fiscal year 2022 level. The legislation:

  • Helps lower energy costs by strengthening America’s energy independence
  • Creates tens of thousands of good-paying jobs with a focus on deploying clean energy technologies and the green jobs of tomorrow in communities across the country
  • Confronts the climate crisis with more than $16 billion of transformative investments in clean energy and science, which will help develop clean, affordable, and secure American energy
  • Rebuilds our nation’s water infrastructure, critical to protecting communities from more frequent and severe storms and to addressing the worsening western drought
  • Strengthens our national security by providing for a safe and secure nuclear deterrent and protects our environment by funding legacy nuclear cleanup work

“From unleashing energy innovation and utilizing the Defense Production Act to boost domestic manufacturing, to responsibly managing water resources and tackling the crisis of climate change – this Energy and Water bill delivers for America’s needs in the 21st century,” Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee Chairwoman Marcy Kaptur (D-OH-09) said. “By propelling energy independence and rebuilding critical water infrastructure, we will lower costs, strengthen communities, and support good-paying jobs for hardworking Americans across the country.”

“Americans are living paycheck-to-paycheck, struggling to pay their energy bills. The 2023 Energy and Water funding bill meets so many of our most pressing energy, water infrastructure, and climate challenges while helping to lower energy costs,” Appropriations Committee Chair Rosa DeLauro (D-CT-03) said. “We are building on the critical investments included in the 2022 bill to create American jobs and support economic development all over America. Additionally, these investments responsibly strengthen our nuclear deterrent, protect our national security, and meet our obligations to environmental cleanup efforts. With funding to confront the climate crisis, increase energy security, and rebuild critical infrastructure, this funding will impact every corner of our nation.”   

The bill’s nondefense discretionary allocation totals $26 billion, $2.25 billion above the fiscal year 2022 level, and the defense discretionary allocation totals $30.725 billion, $1.15 billion above the fiscal year 2022 level.

A summary of the draft fiscal year 2023 Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies bill is below. The text of the draft bill is here. The subcommittee markup will be webcast live and linked on the House Committee on Appropriations website.

Bill Summary:

Army Corps of Engineers – For fiscal year 2023, the bill provides a total of $8.889 billion, an increase of $545 million above the fiscal year 2022 level and $2.288 billion above the request.

  • Investigations – The bill provides $160 million, an increase of $17 million above the fiscal year 2022 level and $54 million above the request.
  • Construction – The bill provides $2.475 billion, an increase of $1.254 billion above the request.
  • Operation and Maintenance – The bill provides $5.15 billion, an increase of $580 million above the fiscal year 2022 level.
  • Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund projects receive an estimated $2.318 billion, an increase of $269 million above the fiscal year 2022 level and $592 million above the request. The bill provides these funds in accordance with the budgetary adjustments made by the CARES Act and the Water Resources Development Act of 2020.

Department of the Interior and Bureau of Reclamation – For fiscal year 2023, the bill provides a total of $1.913 billion for the Department, an increase of $479.7 million above the request.

  • Central Utah Project – The bill provides $23 million, an increase of $3 million above the request.
  • Bureau of Reclamation – The bill provides $1.891 billion, an increase of $476.7 million above the request. Within Reclamation:
    • The bill provides $451 million in additional funding for water resources projects, including those authorized in the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation (WIIN) Act.
    • The bill provides $189.3 million for WaterSMART programs, an increase of $49.8 million above the fiscal year 2022 level and $126.9 million above the request, to assist western states and communities as they respond to the historic drought.
    • Within additional funding, $54 million above the request is provided for rural water projects.

Department of Energy – For fiscal year 2023, the bill provides a total of $48.2 billion for the Department, an increase of $3.3 billion above the fiscal year 2022 level.

  • Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy – The bill provides $4 billion, an increase of $800 million above the fiscal year 2022 level. This funding provides for clean, affordable, and secure energy and ensures American leadership in the transition to a global clean energy economy.
    • State and Community Energy Programs – The bill provides $562 million, an effective increase of $135 million above the fiscal year 2022 level. This funding will support Weatherization Assistance Program, Weatherization Readiness Fund, State Energy Program, Local Government Energy Program, and Energy Future Grants.
  • Cybersecurity, Energy Security, and Emergency Response – The bill provides $205 million, an increase of $19 million above the fiscal year 2022 level. This funding provides for efforts to secure the nation’s energy infrastructure against all hazards, reduce the risks of and impacts from cybersecurity events, and assist with restoration activities.
  • Electricity – The bill provides $350 million, an increase of $73 million above the fiscal year 2022 level. This funding will advance technologies to increase the resiliency and efficiency of the nation’s electricity delivery system with capabilities to incorporate growing amounts of clean energy technologies.
  • Nuclear Energy – The bill provides $1.78 billion, an increase of $125 million above the fiscal year 2022 level and $105 million above the request. The funding invests in research, development, and demonstration activities that develop the next generation of clean and safe reactors, further improve the safety and economic viability of our current reactor fleet, and contribute to the nation’s long-term leadership in the global nuclear power industry. The bill includes funds to support activities related to interim storage of nuclear waste.
  • Fossil Energy and Carbon Management – The bill provides $880 million, an increase of $55 million above the fiscal year 2022 level. This funding advances carbon reduction and mitigation in sectors and applications that are difficult to decarbonize, including the industrial sector, with technologies and methods such as carbon capture and storage, hydrogen, and direct air capture, while assisting in facilitating the transition toward a net-zero carbon economy and rebuilding a U.S. critical minerals supply chain.
  • Energy Projects – The bill provides $117.3 million for Community Project Funding in the Department of Energy.
  • Science – The bill provides $8 billion, an increase of $525 million above the fiscal year 2022 level and $201 million above the request. The Office of Science funds basic science research in physics, biology, chemistry, and other science disciplines to expand scientific understanding and secure the nation’s global leadership in energy innovation. The research supports nearly 29,000 researchers located at over 300 institutions, spanning all 50 states. The supported scientific user facilities serve nearly 34,000 users.
  • Nuclear Waste Disposal – The bill provides $10.2 million for oversight of the Nuclear Waste Fund.
  • Defense Production Act Domestic Clean Energy Accelerator – The bill provides $100 million for activities at the Department of Energy using the Defense Production Act to accelerate domestic manufacturing of key clean energy technologies, including solar panels and transformers.
  • Advanced Research Projects Agency—Energy – The bill provides $550 million, an increase of $100 million above the fiscal year 2022 level. This funding supports research aimed at rapidly developing energy technologies that are capable of significantly changing the energy sector to address the nation’s critical economic, environmental, and energy security challenges.
  • Indian Energy Policy and Programs – The bill provides $75 million, an increase of $17 million above the fiscal year 2022 level. This funding will provide technical assistance, direct and remote education, policy research and analysis, and financial assistance to Indian tribes, Alaska Native Village and Regional Corporations, and Tribal Energy Resource Development Organizations.
  • National Nuclear Security Administration – The bill provides $21.2 billion for DOE’s nuclear security programs. This funding will maintain a safe, secure, and credible nuclear deterrent while addressing the threat of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. This includes:
    • Weapons Activities – The bill provides $16.3 billion, an increase of $413 million above the fiscal year 2022 level, to maintain a safe and reliable nuclear deterrent.
    • Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation – The bill provides $2.42 billion, an increase of $70 million above the fiscal year 2022 level and $77 million above the request. This funding secures nuclear material at home and abroad, combats the threat of nuclear terrorism, and provides emergency response capabilities.
    • Naval Reactors – The bill provides $2 billion, an increase of $82 million above the fiscal year 2022 level, to continue safe and reliable operation of the Navy’s nuclear-powered fleet.
  • Environmental Management – The bill provides $7.88 billion, an increase of $45 million above the request. This funding is used for nuclear cleanup work at 15 sites across the country. This includes:
    • Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup – The bill provides $333.9 million, an increase of $10.6 million above the request.
    • Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning – The bill provides $823.3 million, an increase of $900,000 above the request.
    • Defense Environmental Cleanup – The bill provides $6.7 billion, an increase of $12.5 million above the fiscal year 2022 level.
  • Loan Guarantee Programs – The bill maintains the funding necessary to manage the programs. Additionally, the bill provides $15 billion in additional loan authority for the Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program and $8 million in additional credit subsidy for the Tribal Energy Loan Guarantee Program.
  • Power Marketing Administrations – The bill provides the net request levels for the Southeastern Power Administration, Southwestern Power Administration, and Western Area Power Administration.

Independent Agencies

  • Nuclear Regulatory Commission – The bill provides a total net appropriation of $137 million, equal to the request. This funds regulatory activities to ensure the safe use of nuclear reactors and radioactive materials while protecting people and the environment.
  • Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board – The bill provides $41.4 million, an increase of $5.4 million above the fiscal year 2022 level. The Board provides recommendations regarding public health and safety matters at Department of Energy defense nuclear facilities.
  • Appalachian Regional Commission – The bill provides $220 million, an increase of $25 million above the fiscal year 2022 level. The Commission funds efforts in the Appalachian Region to promote economic and community development, education and job training, and critical infrastructure.
  • Delta Regional Authority – The bill provides $30.1 million, equal to the request. This funding targets the economic development needs of distressed portions of the Mississippi River Delta Region.
  • Denali Commission – The bill provides $15.1 million, equal to the request. This funding provides critical utilities, infrastructure, health services, and economic support throughout Alaska.
  • Northern Border Regional Commission – The bill provides $38 million, an increase of $3 million above the fiscal year 2022 level and $2 million above the request. This funding targets the economic development needs of distressed portions of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York.
  • Southeast Crescent Regional Commission – The bill provides $33 million, an increase of $28 million above the fiscal year 2022 level and $26 million above the request. This funding targets the economic development needs of distressed portions of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.
  • Southwest Border Regional Commission – The bill provides $2.5 million, equal to the request. The Commission is authorized to fund the economic development needs of distressed portions of Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas.
  • Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board – The bill provides $3.9 million, equal to the request. The Board provides independent technical oversight of the Department of Energy’s nuclear waste disposal program.

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117th Congress