House to Consider Domestic Priorities and International Assistance Appropriations Minibus This Week

December 16, 2019
Press Release

WASHINGTON — In advance of Floor consideration this week, the House Appropriations Committee released a division-by-division summary of a domestic priorities and international assistance appropriations minibus of eight fiscal year 2020 appropriations bills. The House is expected to consider the legislation, H.R. 1865, on Tuesday, December 17.

The domestic priorities and international assistance appropriations minibus reflects conference agreements for the the following spending bills: Labor-Health and Human Services-Education, Agriculture-Rural Development-Food and Drug Administration, Energy and Water Development, Interior-Environment, Legislative Branch, Military Construction-Veterans Affairs, State-Foreign Operations, and Transportation-Housing and Urban Development. 

A division-by-division summary of H.R. 1865 is below and available as a PDF here. Text of the minibus is available here. Text of joint explanatory statements is available at these links: front matterDivision ADivision BDivision CDivision DDivision EDivision FDivision GDivision H.

Domestic Priorities and International Assistance Appropriations Minibus, H.R. 1865
DIVISION-BY-DIVISION SUMMARY

H.R. 1865 totals $540.4 billion and reflects conference agreements for the the FY 2020 Labor-Health and Human Services-Education, Agriculture-Rural Development-Food and Drug Administration, Energy and Water Development, Interior-Environment, Legislative Branch, Military Construction-Veterans Affairs State-Foreign Operations, and Transportation-Housing and Urban Development appropriations bills:  

In total, the package provides:

  • $35.9 billion in base defense funding;
  • $484.5 billion in base nondefense funding;
  • $0.6 billion for defense Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO);
  • $8 billion for nondefense OCO;
  • $6.2 billion for defense emergency requirements;
  • $4.6 billion for nondefense emergency requirements, program integrity, and wildfire suppression; and
  • $0.6 billion for 21st Century Cures Act funding.

Table of Contents

Labor-HHS-Education

Agriculture-Rural Development-FDA

Energy & Water Development

Interior-Environment

Legislative Branch

Military Construction-Veterans Affairs

State & Foreign Operations

Transportation-Housing & Urban Development

Authorizing Matters

 

Division A – Labor-HHS-Education

Overview:

The Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies bill includes funding for programs within the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and other related agencies, including the Social Security Administration.

In total, the FY 2020 bill includes $184.9 billion in discretionary funding, an increase of $4.9 billion over the 2019 enacted level and $43 billion over the President’s 2020 budget request.

The LHHS bill supports some of the nation’s most critical programs that touch individuals and families throughout their lifespan, from Early Head Start to Social Security. Many of the bill’s programs have been shortchanged in recent years. The FY 2020 bill provides new investments in areas critical to millions of families to help make up for lost ground.

Bill Summary:

Department of Labor (DOL) – The bill provides a total of $12.4 billion in discretionary appropriations for DOL – $291 million above the 2019 enacted level and $1.4 billion above the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • $9.3 billion for the Employment Training Administration, $178 million above the 2019 enacted level and $1.4 billion above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
     
    • $2.8 billion for Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Grants, $30 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and President’s budget request.
       
    • $92 million for Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers, an increase of $3 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposed to eliminate this program.
       
    • $98 million for the Reintegration of Ex-Offenders, an increase of $5 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $20 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $175 million for Registered Apprenticeships, an increase of $15 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
       
    • $95 million for YouthBuild, an increase of $5 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $10 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $40 million for a new investment in community colleges and eligible four-year partners through Strengthening Community College Training Grants. Funding will help meet local and regional labor market demand for a skilled workforce by providing training to workers in in-demand industries.
       
    • $1.7 billion for Job Corps, $25 million above the 2019 enacted level and $728 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $405 million for the Senior Community Service Employment for Older Americans Program, $5 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposed to eliminate this program.
       
  • $1.7 billion for Worker Protection Agencies, $48 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $21 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
     
    • $242 million for the Wage and Hour Division, an increase of $13 million above the 2019 enacted level and $9 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $582 million for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, an increase of $24 million above the 2019 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
       
    • $106 million for the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, an increase of $3 million above the 2019 enacted level and $2 million above the President’s budget request.
       
  • $96 million for the International Labor Affairs Bureau (ILAB), an increase of $10 million above the 2019 enacted level and $78 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $14 million for the Women’s Bureau, an increase of $300,000 above the 2019 enacted level and $11 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the Women in Apprenticeship and Nontraditional Occupations (WANTO) program is funded at $1.3 million, $300,000 above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget proposed to eliminate WANTO.
     
  • $311 million for Veterans Employment and Training Service (VETS), an increase of $11 million above the 2019 enacted level and $5 million above the President’s budget request. Of this amount:
     
    • $55 million for the Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program, an increase of $5 million above the 2019 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
       
    • $29 million for the Transition Assistance Program, an increase of $6 million above the 2019 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
       
    • $300,000 to establish a Disabled Veteran Program to address the high unemployment and low labor force participation rate of veterans with service-connected and non-service-connected disabilities.

Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) – The bill includes a total of $94.9 billion for HHS, an increase of $4.4 billion above the 2019 enacted level and $16.8 billion above the President’s budget request.

  • National Institutes of Health (NIH) – The bill provides a total of $41.7 billion for NIH, an increase of $2.6 billion above the 2019 enacted level and $7.5 billion above the President’s budget request.

The bill continues to support several critical research initiatives, including:

  • $2.8 billion for Alzheimer’s disease research.
     
  • $3.1 billion for HIV/AIDS research.
     
  • $500 million for the All of Us precision medicine research initiative.
     
  • $500 million for the Brain Research through Application of Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) initiative.
     
  • $195 million for the Cancer Moonshot research initiative.
     
  • $50 million for the Childhood Cancer Data Initiative, as well as $30 million to implement the Childhood Cancer STAR Act.
     
  • $12.5 million for firearm injury and mortality prevention research.
     
  • $75 million for Research Centers in Minority Institutions.
     
  • $200 million for research to develop a universal flu vaccine.

Additionally, the bill provides sufficient funding to increase the appropriation for each Institute and Center by no less than 3.3 percent.

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – The bill includes a total of $8 billion for CDC – $636 million above the 2019 enacted level and $1.4 billion above the President’s budget request. This includes $854 million in transfers from the Prevention and Public Health Fund and $225 million in transfers from the HHS Nonrecurring Expenses Fund for a new research support building and campus infrastructure improvements.
     
    • For the first time in more than 20 years, the bill includes funding – $12.5 million – to specifically support firearm injury and mortality prevention research.
       
    • The bill includes significant investments in our nation’s public health infrastructure including:
       
      • $50 million for the first year of a multi-year effort to support modernization of public health data surveillance and analytics at CDC, State and local health departments.
         
      • $63 million, an increase of $3 million, for food safety.
         
    • The bill provides increases for numerous public health efforts, including:
       
      • $140 million to support CDC’s efforts to reduce new HIV infections by 90 percent in 10 years.
         
      • $10 million for the establishment of a suicide prevention program.
         
      • $230 million, an increase of $20 million, to address tobacco and e-cigarettes.
         
      • $27 million, an increase of $2 million, for the Diabetes Prevention Program.
         
      • $342.8 million, an increase of $6.5 million, for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.
         
      • $173.4 million, an increase of $75 million, for global disease detection efforts.
         
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) – The bill funds SAMHSA at $5.9 billion – $140 million above the 2019 enacted level and $205 million above the President’s budget request. SAMHSA funding includes increased support for:
     
    • Mental health resources for children and youth including $102 million for Project AWARE, an increase of $31 million; and $69 million for the National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative, an increase of $5 million.
       
    • Suicide prevention including $16 million for the Zero Suicide program, an increase of $7 million; and $19 million for the Suicide Lifeline, an increase of $7 million.
       
    • Substance abuse treatment: $3.8 billion, an increase of $19 million, including continued funding for opioid prevention and treatment.
       
    • Substance abuse prevention: $206 million, an increase of $1 million above the 2019 enacted level.
       
  • Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) – The bill includes $7.3 billion for HRSA, which is $177 million above the 2019 enacted level and $1.2 billion above the President’s budget request. The amount includes:
     
    • $1.6 billion for the Health Centers program.
       
    • $2.4 billion, an increase of $70 million, for the Ryan White HIV/AIDS program.
       
    • $50 million in Health Centers and $70 million in the Ryan White HIV/AIDS program to reduce new HIV infections by 90 percent in 10 years.
       
    • $1.2 billion, an increase of $98 million, for HRSA’s Bureau of Health Professions programs to support the medical workforce.
       
    • $944 million, an increase of $17 million, for programs to improve maternal and child health, including an additional $5 million to reduce maternal mortality.
       
    • $286 million for the Title X Family Planning program.
       
  • Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) – The bill provides $338 million for AHRQ.
  • Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) – The bill provides $4 billion for CMS administrative expenses, an increase of $396 million above the President’s budget request.
  • Administration for Children and Families (ACF) – The bill provides $24.4 billion in discretionary funding for ACF, which is $1.2 billion above the 2019 enacted level and $6.1 billion above the President’s budget request.
     
    • Early childhood programs receive an increase of $1.1 billion: 
       
      • $5.8 billion for the Child Care and Development Block Grant, an increase of $550 million;
         
      • $10.6 billion for Head Start, an increase of $550 million; and
         
      • $275 million for Preschool Development Grants, an increase of $25 million.
         
    • $3.7 billion for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), an increase of $50 million.
       
    • $740 million for the Community Services Block Grant, an increase of $15 million. 
       
  • Administration for Community Living (ACL)  The bill funds ACL at $2.3 billion, which is $54 million above the 2019 enacted level and $218 million above the President’s budget request. This amount includes:
     
    • $937 million for Senior Nutrition programs, an increase of $30 million above the 2019 enacted level.
       
    • $196 million for Family Caregivers Services, an increase of $5 million above the 2019 enacted level. 
  • Office of the Secretary—General Departmental Management – The bill provides $544 million, an increase of $8.5 million above the 2019 enacted level and $145 million above the President’s budget request. The amount includes:
     
    • $108 million for the Teen Pregnancy Prevention program.
       
    • $59 million for the Office of Minority Health, an increase of $2 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level.
       
    • $54 million for the Minority HIV/AIDS Initiative.
       
    • $34 million for the Office on Women’s Health, an increase of $1.5 million above the 2019 enacted level.
       
    • $5 million for KidneyX, a new public-private partnership to accelerate the development and adoption of novel therapies and technologies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of kidney diseases.
       
  • Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund (PHSSEF) – The bill provides $2.7 billion for PHSSEF, an increase of $106 million above the 2019 enacted level and $71 million above the President’s budget request. The total funding level includes:
     
    • $562 million for the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), the same as the 2019 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
       
    • $735 million for Project BioShield, the same as the 2019 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
       
    • $705 million, an increase of $95 million, for the Strategic National Stockpile.
       
    • $11 million for the National Ebola Training and Education Center and 10 existing regional Ebola and other special pathogen treatment centers. This effort was previously supported with Ebola supplemental funds.

Department of Education (ED)  The bill provides a total of $72.8 billion in discretionary appropriations for ED – $1.3 billion above the 2019 enacted level and $8.7 billion above the President’s budget request.

  • K-12 Education – Overall, the bill provides $40.1 billion for K-12 education programs, including the Individuals with Disabilities Act, an increase of $1.2 billion above the 2019 enacted level and $5.9 billion above the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:
     
    • $16.3 billion for Title I Grants to Local Educational Agencies, an increase of $450 million above the 2019 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
       
    • $13.9 billion for Special Education, an increase of $417 million above the 2019 enacted level and the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill provides:
       
      • $12.8 billion for Part B Grants to States, an increase of $400 million above the 2019 enacted level and President’s budget request; and
         
      • $20.1 million for Special Olympics education programs, an increase of $2.5 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget initially proposed to eliminate this program.
         
    • $2.1 billion for Supporting Effective Instruction State Grants (Title II-A), an increase of $76 million over the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget proposed to eliminate this program.  This is the first increase for the program since fiscal year 2014.
       
    • $787 million for English Language Acquisition, an increase of $50 million above the 2019 enacted level and the President’s budget request. This is the first increase for the program since fiscal year 2015.
       
    • $1.2 billion for Student Support and Academic Enrichment State Grants, an increase of $40 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget proposed to eliminate this program.
       
    • $1.2 billion for 21st Century Community Learning Centers, an increase of $28 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget proposed to eliminate this program. The program is renamed the Nita M. Lowey 21st Century Community Learning Centers.
       
    • $123 million for a new Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) Initiative to support SEL and “whole child” approaches to education. Within this amount, the bill provides:
       
      • $65 million in new funds within the Education Innovation and Research program for grants for evidence-based, field-initiated innovations that address student social, emotional, and cognitive needs;
         
      • $23 million for a new competition within the Supporting Effective Educator Development (SEED) grant program with a priority for teacher professional development and pathways into teaching that provide a strong foundation in child development and learning, including skills for implementing SEL strategies;
         
      • $10 million within the School Safety National Activities program to make schools safer through a new competition that will help local educational agencies (LEAs) directly increase the number of mental health and child development experts in schools; and
         
      • $25 million for Full-Service Community Schools, an increase of $8 million over the 2019 enacted level, to provide comprehensive services and expand evidence-based models that meet the holistic needs of children, families, and communities.
         
    • $65 million within the Education Innovation and Research program for grants to expand opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM), including computer science, an increase of $5 million above the 2019 enacted level.
       
    • $440 million for the Charter School Program, level with the 2019 enacted level and $60 million below the President’s budget request.
  • Student Financial Assistance – The bill provides $24.5 billion for Federal student aid programs, $75 million above the 2019 enacted level and $1.5 billion above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill provides:
     
    • $6,345 for the maximum Pell Grant, an increase of $150 over the 2019 enacted level and the President’s budget request. The increase will help the maximum award keep pace with inflation.
       
    • $865 million for the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant program, an increase of $25 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposed to eliminate this program.
       
    • $1.2 billion for Federal Work Study, an increase of $50 million above the 2019 enacted level and $680 million above the President’s budget request.
       
  • Higher Education – The bill provides $2.5 billion for higher education programs, an increase of $163 million above the 2019 enacted level and $941 million above the President’s budget request.
     
    • Within this amount, the bill provides $760 million, an increase of $93 million over the 2019 enacted level and $220 million over the President’s budget request, to assist primarily Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) in the Aid for Institutional Development account, including:
       
    • $325 million for Historically Black Colleges and Universities, an increase of $42 million above the 2019 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
       
    • $143 million for Hispanic Serving Institutions, an increase of $19 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget proposes to consolidate this and other MSI programs into a single MSI grant program, which the bill rejects.
       
    • $37 million for Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities, an increase of $5 million above the 2019 enacted level and $9 million over the President’s budget request.
       
    • The bill also provides investments in the following higher education programs:
       
      • $1.1 billion for Federal TRIO programs, an increase of $30 million above the 2019 enacted level and $140 million above the President’s budget request.
         
      • $365 million for GEAR UP, an increase of $5 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget proposed to consolidate the program into the TRIO programs.
         
      • $50 million for Teacher Quality Partnerships, an increase of $7 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposes to eliminate this program.
         
      • $53 million for the Child Care Access Means Parents in School, an increase of $3 million above the 2019 enacted level and $38 million above the President’s budget request.
         
      • $7 million to restart the Centers of Excellence for Veterans Student Success ProgramThe President’s budget request did not include funding for this program.
         
      • $7 million for the continued support of the Open Textbooks pilot, an increase of $2 million over the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request did not include funding for this program.
         
      • $10 million for Career Pathways, a new initiative to provide multiple pathways to postsecondary and career success. The President’s budget request did not include funding for this program.
         
  • $130 million for the Office for Civil Rights, an increase of $5 million over the FY 2019 enacted    level and the President’s budget request.

Related Agencies –

  • $1.1 billion for the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), an increase of $21 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget proposed to eliminate CNCS and included $104 million for this purpose.
     
    • Within the total amount, the bill includes $221 million for Senior Corps programs, an increase of $13 million over the 2019 enacted level. With this increase, the stipend can increase to $3.00/hour for the first time.
       
  • $465 million for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), in 2022 advance funding, an increase of $20 million above the 2019 enacted level. In addition, the bill includes $20 million for the interconnection system and system wide infrastructure, the same as the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposes to eliminate the CPB and includes $30 million for this purpose.
     
  • $252 million for the Institute of Museum and Library Services, an increase of $10 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposes to eliminate IMLS and includes $23 million for this purpose.
     
  • $12.9 billion for the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) operating expenses, with an increase of $100 million above the 2019 enacted level to hire additional staff at field offices, teleservice and processing centers and improve public service.

Division B – Agriculture-Rural Development-FDA

Overview:

The Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies bill funds agencies and programs within the Department of Agriculture, the Farm Credit Administration, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, and the Food and Drug Administration.

The FY 2020 bill provides $23.493 billion in discretionary funding, $183 million above the FY2019 enacted level. In addition, it provides the latest estimates for mandatory programs required by law.

The bill funds important agricultural and food programs and services, including food and medical product safety, animal and plant health programs, rural development, farm services, agricultural trade, financial marketplace oversight, and nutrition programs, both domestic and international.

Bill Summary:

Rural Development and Infrastructure  The bill provides a total of almost $3.8 billion for rural development programs. These programs help create an environment for economic growth by providing business and housing opportunities and building sustainable rural infrastructure for the modern economy.

  • Critical Infrastructure  The legislation includes responsible investments in infrastructure to help rural areas of the country access basic utilities. This includes $1.45 billion for rural water and waste program loans, and more than $545 million in water and waste grants for clean and reliable drinking water systems and sanitary waste disposal systems. An additional $6.9 billion in loan authority is provided for rural electric and telephone infrastructure loans.
  • Rural Broadband  The legislation invests more than $640 million in the expansion of broadband service to provide economic development opportunities and improved education and healthcare services. These significant investments in broadband reflect a commitment to enabling Americans in rural communities to access digital tools necessary to improve health, educational, and economic outcomes.
  • Rural Housing Loans and Rental Assistance – The bill provides a total of $24 billion in loan authority for the Single Family Housing Guaranteed Loan Program. The bill includes $1 billion in direct single family housing loans, meeting the estimated need for these loans, which provide home loan assistance to low-income rural families, many of whom would have few loan options for purchasing a home because of their geographical location. In addition, $1.375 billion is provided for rental assistance for affordable rental housing for low-income families and the elderly in rural communities for renewal of all existing rental assistance contracts.

Food and Nutrition Programs  The legislation contains discretionary funding, as well as mandatory funding required by law, for food and nutrition programs within USDA. This includes funding for the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and child nutrition programs.

  • WIC  The bill provides $6 billion in discretionary funding for WIC, which fully funds participation this year. The bill increases the breastfeeding peer counselor program to $90 million.
  • Child nutrition programs  The bill provides for $23.615 billion in required mandatory funding – which is outside the discretionary funding jurisdiction of the Appropriations Committee – for child nutrition programs. This is $474 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level. This funding will provide free or reduced-price school lunches and snacks for children who qualify for the program. The bill provides approximately $526 million for the Summer Food Service Program to ensure low-income children continue to receive nutritious meals when school is not in session. In addition, the bill provides $35 million for the Summer EBT program, $30 million for school kitchen equipment grants, and $5 million for school breakfast expansion grants – the first time since 2012 the program has been funded. 
  • SNAP  The bill provides for $67.886 billion in required mandatory spending for SNAP. For the first time, SNAP reserve funds are available for three full years to provide certainty in case of a future shutdown.

International Food Assistance Programs  The legislation contains $1.945 billion for international food aid and for the promotion of U.S. agricultural exports overseas. This includes $1.725 billion for Food for Peace grants and $220 million for the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition program. This represents the highest-ever level of funding for these two vital programs. These programs work to reduce famine and increase food security overseas.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA)  The FDA receives a total of $3.16 billion in discretionary funding in the bill, $91 million above the 2019 enacted level. Total funding for the FDA, including user fees, is $5.77 billion. Within this total, the Committee provides targeted increases for medical product and food safety activities, including new initiatives to revolutionize the safety of the nation’s blood supply and to enable faster responses to foodborne illness outbreaks. In addition, the bill includes a strong focus on continuing FDA’s efforts to advance generic drug reviews and increase medical product manufacturing in the U.S. The bill also appropriates $75 million to accelerate medical product development as authorized in the 21st Century Cures Act.

Food Safety and Inspection Service  The legislation includes $1.05 billion for food safety and inspection programs. These mandatory inspection activities help to ensure safe, meat and poultry on American tables. The funding provided will maintain nearly 8,800 frontline inspection personnel for meat, poultry, and egg products at more than 6,400 facilities across the country. 

Marketing Programs  The bill provides $187 million, $28 million above FY 2019 and $72 million above the President’s request, to facilitate the movement of agriculture products and open market opportunities. This includes $16 million for the National Organic Program to protect the integrity of the USDA Organic label and $16.5 million for the new hemp production program. The bill also provides $17.4 million in discretionary funds to the Agricultural Marketing Service and Rural Development for the Local Agriculture Market Program to continue supporting local food and value-added agriculture. In addition, the bill provides $20 million to support dairy innovation centers.

Farm Programs  The legislation provides $1.807 billion for farm programs, $37 million above the fiscal year 2019 level. This includes an increase of $35 million to address staffing shortages across the country. This funding will continue support for various farm, conservation, and emergency loan programs, and help American farmers and ranchers. It will also meet estimates of demand for farm loan programs.

Animal and Plant Health  The legislation includes $1.046 billion – $31.6 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level – for the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. This funding will support programs to help control or eradicate plant and animal pests and diseases that can be crippling to U.S. producers. The funding level provides increases that will help address harmful pests and diseases such as cattle fever ticks and chronic wasting disease, while maintaining increases from past years for citrus greening.

Conservation Programs  The bill provides $1.015 billion to help farmers, ranchers, and other private landowners conserve and protect their land. This includes $185 million for infrastructure for watershed and flood prevention and watershed rehabilitation projects.

Agricultural Research  The bill provides $3.2 billion – $171 million above the fiscal year 2019 level – for agriculture research programs, including the Agricultural Research Service and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture. This funding will support research at all ARS facilities to help mitigate and stop devastating crop diseases, improve food safety and water quality, increase production, develop critically needed vaccines for diseases like African swine fever, and combat antimicrobial resistance. This funding also includes important research investments in U.S. land-grant colleges and universities, including a significant increase for the 1890 institutions, and for the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s premier competitive research program.

Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC)  Included in the bill is $315 million for the CFTC, which is the same as the request and $47 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level.

Policy Provisions –

  • Extends and expands disaster assistance to continue assisting farmers, ranchers, and producers in states that were devasted by natural disasters.
  • Tightens the reprogramming process by explicitly prohibiting any implementation actions or public announcements about a reprogramming proposal while it is pending before Congress.
  • Prohibits USDA from reorganizing agencies within the Department unless Congress affirms it in legislation.
  • Requires USDA to restore to its website the Animal Welfare Act and Horse Protection Act inspection reports taken down in February 2017 and to maintain all subsequent reports on line thereafter.

Division C – Energy & Water Development

Overview:

The Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies bill funds the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Interior programs, the Department of Energy, and other related agencies.

The FY 2020 bill provides $48.3 billion in discretionary funding, $10.3 billion above the President’s budget request and $3.7 billion above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level.  That amount includes $24.25 billion for defense-related activities, $1 billion above the request and $1.8 billion above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level.  The amount also includes $24.1 billion for non-defense activities, $9.3 billion above the request and $1.9 billion above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level. 

Bill Summary:

Army Corps of Engineers – Provides $7.65 billion, an increase of $652 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $2.69 billion above the budget request.

  • Funding for Investigations is $151 million, an increase of $26 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $74 million above the request.
     
  • Funding for Construction is $2.68 billion, an increase of $498 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $1.37 billion above the request.
     
  • Funding for Operation and Maintenance is $3.79 billion, an increase of $1.86 billion above the request.
     
  • Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund projects receive $1.63 billion, an increase of $665 million above the request. This exceeds the target set by the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014, and represents 91.5 percent of estimated revenues compared to the fiscal year 2020 target of 80 percent. 
     
  • The bill makes full use of the estimated receipts and some additional prior year revenues for the Inland Waterways Trust Fund.
     
  • Provides six new study starts and six new construction starts.

Department of Interior/Bureau of Reclamation – Provides $1.68 billion, an increase of $115 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $560 million above the budget request.

  • Provides $20 million for the Central Utah Project, $5 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and an increase of $10 million above the request.
     
  • Provides $1.66 billion for the Bureau of Reclamation, an increase of $110 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $550 million above the request. Within Reclamation:
     
    • Provides $550 million in additional funding for water resources projects, including those authorized in the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation (WIIN) Act.
       
    • Within additional funding, $117 million is provided for rural water projects above the budget request.

Department of Energy  Provides $38.586 billion for the Department, an increase of $2.9 billion above the fiscal year 2019 level and $7 billion above the budget request.

  • Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy  Provides $2.79 billion, an increase of $411 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $2.5 billion above the request.  This funding provides for clean, affordable, and secure energy and ensures American leadership in the transition to a global clean energy economy.
     
  • Cybersecurity, Energy Security, and Emergency Response  Provides $156 million, an increase of $36 million above the fiscal year 2019 level.  This funding provides for efforts to secure the nation’s energy infrastructure against all hazards, reduce the risks of and impacts from cybersecurity events, and assist with restoration activities.
     
  • Electricity  Provides $190 million, an increase of $34 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $7.5 million above the request.  This funding will advance technologies to increase the resiliency and efficiency of the nation’s electricity delivery system with capabilities to incorporate growing amounts of clean energy technologies.
     
  • Nuclear Energy  Provides $1.49 billion, an increase of $167 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $669 million above the request.  This funding invests in activities to further improve the safety and economic viability of our current reactor fleet, develop the next generation of clean and safe reactors, and establishes an advanced reactors demonstration program. 
     
  • Fossil Energy Research and Development  Provides $750 million, $188 million above the request.  This funding provides for research, development, and demonstration activities to ensure the safe, efficient, and environmentally sound use of fossil energy resources.
     
  • Science  Provides $7 billion, an increase of $415 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $1.5 billion above the request.  The Office of Science funds basic science research in physics, biology, chemistry, and other science disciplines to expand scientific understanding and secure the nation’s global leadership in energy innovation.
     
  • Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy  Provides $425 million, an increase of $59 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and rejects the budget proposal to eliminate this program.  This funding supports research aimed at rapidly developing energy technologies that are capable of significantly changing the energy sector to address our critical economic, environmental, and energy security challenges.
     
  • National Nuclear Security Administration  Provides $16.7 billion, an increase of $1.5 billion above the fiscal year 2019 level and $220 million above the budget request.  This funding will maintain a safe, secure, and credible nuclear deterrent while addressing the threat of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. This includes:
     
    • Weapons Activities - $12.46 billion, an increase of $1.36 billion above the fiscal year 2019 level to maintain a credible nuclear deterrent.
       
    • Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation - $2.164 billion, an increase of $234 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $171 million above the request. This funding secures nuclear material both globally and domestically.
       
    • Naval Nuclear Reactors - $1.648 billion, equal to the request, to continue safe and reliable operation of the Navy’s nuclear-powered fleet.
       
    • Federal Salaries and Expenses - $434.7 million, an increase of $24.7 million above the fiscal year 2019 level, to strengthen federal oversight and program and project management.
       
  • Environmental Cleanup  Provides $7.46 billion, an increase of $280 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $986 million above the budget request.  This funding is used for nuclear waste cleanup at 16 sites across the country.
     
    • Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup - $319 million, an increase of $9 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $72 million above the request.
       
    • Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning - $881 million, an increase of $40 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $166 million above the request.
       
    • Defense Environmental Cleanup - $6.255 billion, an increase of $231 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $748 million above the request.
       
  • Loan Guarantee Programs – Rejects the President’s proposal to eliminate these programs and includes a net appropriation of $29 million for the Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program, $5 million for the Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program, and $2 million for the Tribal Energy Loan Guarantee Program.
     
  • Power Marketing Administrations – Provides the budget request levels for the Southeastern Power Administration, Southwestern Power Administration, and Western Area Power Administration.  The agreement rejects the President’s proposal to sell the transmission assets of the PMAs, change the laws governing how the PMAs establish power rates, and repeal the borrowing authority for the Western Area Power Administration.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission  Provides a net appropriation of $127.5 million.  This funds regulatory activities to ensure the safe use of nuclear reactors and radioactive materials while protecting people and the environment.

Appalachian Regional Commission  Provides $175 million, which is $10 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $10 million above the budget request.  The Commission funds projects in the Appalachian Region to promote economic development, education and job training, critical infrastructure, and community development. 

Northern Border Regional Commission  Provides $25 million, which is $5 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $24.2 million above the budget request.  This funding targets the economic development needs of distressed portions of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York.

Policy Provisions –

  • A provision to prevent the reorganization of the Army Corps of Engineers, or to transfer Corps functions to other agencies.
  • A provision to allow a transfer of funds from the Western Area Power Administration to the Bureau of Reclamation for environmental stewardship and endangered species recovery purposes.
  • A provision to allow fees collected by the Department of Energy to be expended on a mercury storage facility.
  • A provision to allow the Southeastern Power Administration to pay power systems dispatchers at competitive rates.
  • A provision to allow the Bonneville Power Administration to comply with state clean energy programs.

This division does not include a provision allowing for expanded agricultural exemptions from the Clean Water Act.

Division D – Interior-Environment

Overview:

The Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies bill includes funding for programs within the Department of the Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency, and other related agencies, including the Indian Health Service.

In total, the FY 2020 bill includes $35.989 billion, an increase of $437 million over the 2019 enacted level and $5.83 billion over the President’s 2020 request. There is also an additional $2.25 billion of funding provided under the fire suppression cap adjustment.

Increases in funding will help protect and preserve public lands, build resilience to climate change, strength the environmental workforce, and ensure access to safe drinking water.

Bill Summary:

Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) – The bill provides $495 million for LWCF, including $237 million for the federal program and $258 million for state programs.  The total is $57 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $462 million above the President’s budget request.

Wildland Fire Management (WFM)  The bill provides $5.553 billion for WFM, which includes, for the first time, $2.25 billion in cap adjusted fire suppression funding. The total funding is $1.6 billion above the 2019 enacted level and $32 million above the President’s budget request.

Department of the Interior (DOI)  The bill provides a total of $13.5 billion in discretionary appropriations for DOI – $545 million above the 2019 enacted level and $2.1 billion above the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • $1.4 billion for the Bureau of Land Management, $24 million above the 2019 enacted level and $182 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
     
    • $72 million for sage-grouse conservation, $4 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $28 million above the President’s budget request.
       
  • $1.6 billion for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, $66 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $316 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
     
    • $266 million for Ecological Services, $14 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $26 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $502 million for National Wildlife Refuge System, $14 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $7 million below the President’s budget request.
       
    • $68 million for State and Tribal Wildlife Grants, $3 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $36 million above the President’s budget request.
       
  • $3.38 billion for National Park Service, $155 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $636 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
     
    • $2.58 billion for Operation of the National Park System, $74 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $151 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, $3.3 million is provided for the 400 Years of African-American History Commission and $3.3 million is provided for the Semiquincentennial Commission.
       
    • $71 million for National Recreation and Preservation, $7 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $39 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $119 million for the Historic Preservation Fund, $16 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $86 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes $66 million for State and Tribal Historic Preservation Offices, $16 million for Save America’s Treasures grants, $18 million for competitive grants to preserve the sites and stories of underrepresented community civil rights, and $10 million for grants to Historically Black Colleges and Universities.
       
  • $3.2 billion for Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education, $142 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $449 million above the President’s budget request. The bill accepts the proposed separation of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Bureau of Indian Education. Amounts below reflect the separation. Within the $3.2 billion, the bill includes:
     
    • $1.6 billion for operation of Bureau of Indian Affairs Operation of Indian Programs, $67 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level for the same programs and $115 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $127 million for Bureau of Indian Affairs Construction, $6 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level for the same programs and $68 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $11.8 million for the Indian Guaranteed Loan Program, $1 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $10.9 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • Fully funds Contract Support Costs.
       
  • $943 million for Bureau of Indian Education Operation of Indian Programs, $39 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level for the same programs and $76 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $248 million to Bureau of Indian Education Construction, $10 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level for the same programs and $180 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $450 million for Departmental Offices, $19 million above the 2019 enacted level and $40 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
     
    • $111 million for Office of Insular Affairs, $7 million above the 2019 enacted level and $27 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $56 million for Office of Inspector General, $4 million above the enacted level and $4 million above the President’s budget.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)  The bill provides a total of $9.06 billion in for EPA – $208 million above the 2019 enacted level and $2.83 billion above the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • $3.38 billion for EPA’s core science and environmental program work, an increase of $75 million above the 2019 enacted level and $767 million above the President’s budget request. Within these amounts, the bill includes:
     
    • $510 million for Geographic Programs, which help with restoration of nationally significant bodies of water like the Great Lakes, Chesapeake Bay, and Long Island Sound. This is an increase of $53 million above the 2019 enacted level and $203 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $552 million for compliance monitoring and enforcement activities and grants, a $24 million increase above the 2019 enacted level and $55 million above the President’s request.
       
    • $43 million in new funding at EPA and partner agencies for scientific and regulatory work and cleanup assistance for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), needed to establish drinking water and land cleanup standards. This level of funding more than triples current spending levels for this work.
       
  • $4.25 billion for State and Tribal Assistance Grants, a $115 million increase above the 2019 enacted level and $1.47 billion above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
     
    • $2.77 billion for Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds, equal to the 2019 enacted level and $782 billion above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $71 million for targeted grants to communities for drinking water contaminants like lead, nitrates, and other health hazards.
       
    • $89 million for Brownfields cleanups, a $5 increase above the 2019 enacted level and $27 million increase above the President’s budget request.
       
  • $1.84 billion for Superfund, an increase of $25 million above the 2019 enacted level and $139 million above the President’s request.
     
  • $10.2 million for Environmental Justice activities, a 47% increase above the 2019 enacted level nearly four-fold increase above the President’s budget request.    

Related Agencies –

  • $3.13 billion for the Forest Service (non-fire), an increase of $50 million above the 2019 enacted level and $346 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $6 billion for the Indian Health Service, an increase of $243 million above the 2019 enacted level and $138 million above the President’s budget request.
     
    • $4.3 billion for health services, $212 million above the 2019 enacted level and $29 million above the President’s budget request. This rejects the President’s proposed program cuts and includes $58 million for Urban Indian programs, $65 million to recruit and retain health professionals, $8 million for a new electronic health records system, and $5 million to begin a Community Health Aide Program.
       
    • $912 million for health facilities construction, $33 million above the 2019 enacted level and $109 million above the President’s budget request. This includes an additional $10 million for small health clinics, and $5 million to invest in green infrastructure.
       
  • $162.25 million each for the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, which is $7.25 million more than the 2019 enacted levels and rejects the President’s budget request proposal to eliminate the agencies.
     
  • $1.05 billion for the Smithsonian Institution, an increase of $4 million above the 2019 enacted level and $69 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $14 million for the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, an increase of $2 million above the 2019 enacted level and $6 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $43.5 million for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, an increase of $2.2 million above the 2019 enacted level and $3.8 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $60.4 million for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, $1.4 million above the enacted level and the President’s budget request.

Policy Provisions –

The bill includes the following new policy provisions:

  • Sec. 107 continues longstanding Outer Continental Shelf inspection fees to be collected by the Secretary of the Interior for oil rigs and creates a new non-rig inspection fee.
  • Sec. 117 sets a new requirement for the Department of the Interior to publicly disclose waivers to certain equipment and safety rules for offshore oil and gas drilling.
  • Sec. 426 incorporates Reprogramming Guidelines into the Act.
  • Sec. 442 prohibits oil and gas leasing in Chaco Culture National Historical Park.

The bill includes the following policy riders that were previously enacted:

  • Sec. 116 retains restrictions on the issuance of rules for sage grouse.
  • Sec. 437 continues a provision prohibiting the use of funds to regulate certain livestock greenhouse gas emissions under Title V of the Clean Air Act.
  • Sec. 438 continues a provision prohibiting funds to require greenhouse gas emissions reporting from manure management systems.
  • Sec. 439 retains a provision prohibiting funds to be used to regulate the lead content of ammunition or fishing tackle.
  • Sec. 440 addresses carbon emissions from forest biomass.
  • Sec. 441 addresses small remote incinerators in the State of Alaska.

The bill does not include the following policy riders:

  • Prohibiting destruction of certain structures on Midway Island
  • Allowing for expanded agricultural exemptions under the Clean Water Act. 

Division E – Legislative Branch

Overview:

The legislation funds the Legislative Branch of the U.S. government, including the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, Congressional Budget Office, and Capitol Police. 

The bill appropriates a total of $5.049 billion, $213 million or 4.4 percent more than in FY 2019. 

The FY 2020 Legislative Branch Appropriations bill provides the House of Representatives with increased resources to carry out its responsibilities in developing legislation, conducting oversight, and assisting constituents in their interactions with the Federal Government.  The bill also maintains and builds analytical capacity to support lawmaking and oversight, addresses high-priority needs involving information technology and security, and supports Legislative Branch agencies such as the Library of Congress and the Government Accountability Office in their wider roles of service to the nation.

Bill Summary:

House of Representatives – The bill provides a total of $1.366 billion in discretionary appropriations for the House of Representatives – $133 million above the 2019 enacted level. More than half of this increase addresses shortfalls in areas where current appropriations may not be sufficient to support currently authorized spending.

  • $615 million for the Members Representational Allowance (MRA), the basic office budgets of House Members – $41 million more than FY 2019. In addition to bringing appropriations into line with currently authorized spending, this funding is estimated to support an increase of roughly $55,000 per Member office for 2020.
     
  • $11 million in funding for paid interns, increasing the allowance for paying interns from $20,000 to $25,000 per Member office and extending the program to leadership offices. This allowance helps extend internship opportunities to people who may not be financially able to take an unpaid position.
     
  • $160 million for the operations of House committees, a $9 million increase.  This appropriation will cover the funding allocated to committees for 2020 by the biennial funding resolution adopted by the House in March, which is 3.5 percent above the level allocated in 2018. The bill includes funding to support the extension of the Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress.
     
  • $232 million for the salaries and expenses of House officers and employees, including the Clerk of the House, the Sergeant at Arms, the Chief Administrative Officer, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, and the Office of Whistleblower Ombudsman among others. This total is $12 million above the FY 2019 level.  Most of the increase is targeted to information technology (IT) and security needs.

Other Agencies 

  • $6 million for the Office of Congressional Workplace Rights, maintaining last year’s increased level, to enforce legal rights and protections in the Legislative Branch, including laws against discrimination and sexual harassment.
     
  • $55 million for the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), a $4 million increase over FY 2019. This funding level will allow CBO to continue and modestly increase its efforts to improve modeling and analytical capability in key areas and to make its work as transparent and accessible as possible.
     
  • $630 million for the Government Accountability Office (GAO), a $40 million increase. This level should allow the GAO to sustain fiscal year 2019 increases in staffing to handle its large workload and strengthen its Science, Technology Assessment, and Analytics (STAA) team.
     
  • $725 million, an increase of $29 million, for the Library of Congress, including the Copyright Office, Congressional Research Service, and National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled. This funding level will allow continued progress on urgent information technology needs and on modernization of systems for copyright registration and recordation as well as support ongoing Library initiatives such as the Veterans’ History Project.
     
    • The bill includes $10 million for the Library’s Enhancing the Visitor Experience initiative, bringing the total Federal investment for the project to $20 million.
       
    • The bill also includes $5 million for modernizing the website that handles distribution of audio and braille reading materials at the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled as well as $2 million for purchase of braille e-readers.
       
  • $696 million for the Architect of the Capitol, $38 million less than the fiscal year 2019 total. Funding needs and schedules for several projects have changed since submission of the fiscal year 2020 budget, leading to a decrease in project funding. Priority is given to funding for project management to ensure that adequate oversight is exercised.
     
  • $464 million for the Capitol Police, $8 million more than the FY 2019 total. This increase will help cover the cost of operations to support the national party conventions next year and dignitary protection, as well as meeting current operational needs.

Policy Provisions –  

Compensation of Legislative Branch Employees  The bill includes language that would raise the salary cap for senior staff to a level of $173,900, at the discretion of the employing entity.  This level remains below the Member pay level. This language responds to wide complaints that salary levels prevent Congress from being able to attract staff with required levels of technical expertise to address the increasingly complex policy issues facing the Members.

INCLUDED IN FRONT MATTER: Member Pay Adjustment  The bill includes language blocking the annual pay adjustment for Members of Congress that is required by statute.  

Division F – Military Construction-Veterans Affairs

 Overview:

The Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies bill funds the Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs, and other related agencies, including the American Battle Monuments Commission and Armed Forces Retirement Home.

In total, the FY 2020 bill provides $110.4 billion in discretionary funding – $10.7 billion above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level. This includes $645 million in Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding as well as $6.2 billion for emergency needs related to Hurricanes Michael and Florence at military bases in North Carolina and Florida, needs related to flooding in the Midwest, as well as earthquake damage at China Lake Naval Base 

The funding in this bill will provide for the construction of facilities to enable our military to fight current and emerging threats, to support increased troop levels, and to sustain services for military families. This includes operational facilities, training facilities, hospitals, family housing, National Guard readiness centers, barracks, and other important resources. In total, 145 military construction projects across the country and overseas receive funding in the bill.

Bill Summary:

Military Construction  The bill provides a total of $11.3 billion for military construction projects – an increase of $983 million above the enacted fiscal year 2019 level. In addition to this amount, $645 million is provided in OCO funding for projects in countries with ongoing U.S. operations and the European Deterrence Initiative to combat Russian aggression. These funds will provide for the construction of facilities to enable our military to fight current and emerging threats, to support increased troop levels, and to sustain services for military families. This includes operational facilities, training facilities, hospitals, family housing, National Guard readiness centers, barracks, and other important resources. In total, 145 military construction projects across the country and overseas receive funding in the bill.

  • Military Family Housing  The bill provides $1.3 billion to fund construction, operation, and maintenance of military family housing for fiscal year 2020, the same as the budget request, and provides an additional $140.8 million above the budget request in an administrative provision. The additional funds above the request are provided to address family housing issues such as mold, vermin, and lead in military family housing. This funding will ensure quality housing for all 2,006,171 military families currently served by the program.
     
  • Guard and Reserve  The bill includes $551 million for construction or alteration of Guard and Reserve facilities in states and territories.
     
  • NATO Security Investment Program (NSIP) – The bill provides $172 million, $28 million above the budget request, for infrastructure necessary for wartime, crisis, and peace support and deterrence operations, and training requirements. The funds will support responses to the challenges posed by Russian aggression as well as the risks and threats emanating from the Middle East and North Africa. 
     
  • BRAC/PFAS  The agreement provides an additional $120 million to address legacy Navy BRAC issues and the PFAS issues at installations.

Department of Veterans Affairs  The legislation includes a total of $216.5 billion in both discretionary and mandatory funding for VA, an increase of $19.4 billion above the fiscal year 2019 level. This funding will help address many of the problems currently facing VA and provide for better and increased access to care for our Veterans. Discretionary funding alone for VA programs in the agreement totals $91.9 billion, an increase of $5.4 billion above the fiscal year 2019 level. Approximately $75.6 billion of this discretionary total was provided last year via advance funding in the fiscal year 2019 Appropriations bill. These additional funds will provide resources for important priorities within VA, such as healthcare access for women Veterans, suicide prevention, claims processing, homeless prevention and care, opioid addiction, rural health, and medical research.

  • VA Medical Care  The bill funds VA medical care at $80.2 billion – providing for approximately seven million patients to be treated in fiscal year 2020. Within this total, funding includes: $9.4 billion in mental healthcare services; $222 million in suicide prevention outreach activities; $585 million for gender-specific care for women; $1.8 billion for homeless assistance programs; $402 million for opioid abuse prevention; and $300 million in rural health initiatives.
     
  • VA Electronic Health Record  The bill contains $1.5 billion to continue implementation of the VA electronic health record system. This will ensure the implementation of the contract creating an electronic record system for VA that will be interoperable with the same system being developed for DOD. These two identical systems will ensure our Veterans get proper care, with timely and accurate medical data transferred between VA, DOD, and the private sector. The agreement also continues GAO oversight of this program to ensure that the EHR system is implemented in a timely manner.
     
  • Disability Claims Processing Backlog – The bill provides $125 million above the budget request for the Veterans Benefits Administration for hiring additional claims and appellate staff, and overtime pay in order to continue reducing the disability claims backlog. Within this amount funding is included to hire additional staff to process incoming Blue Water Navy Claims as a result of the Blue Water Veterans Act of 2019 (P.L. 116-23). In addition, the bill continues rigorous reporting requirements to track each regional office’s performance on claims processing and appeals backlogs.
     
  • Construction  Major and minor construction within the VA is funded at $1.6 billion.
     
  • VA Mandatory Funding  The bill fulfills mandatory funding requirements such as: Veteran disability compensation programs for 5.3 million Veterans and their survivors; education benefits for almost one million Veterans; and vocational rehabilitation and employment training for almost 150,000 Veterans.
     
  • Advance Appropriations  The bill contains $87.6 billion in advance fiscal year 2021 funding for Veterans’ medical programs – the same level as the President’s request. This funding will provide for medical services, medical community care, medical support and compliance, and medical facilities, and will ensure that Veterans have continued, full access to their medical care needs. The bill includes $131 billion in advance funding for VA mandatory benefits programs, as requested in the President's budget.

Arlington National Cemetery (ANC)  The bill includes $80.8 million for ANC, which is $10 million above the fiscal year 2020 budget request. The additional funds provide a $10 million increase for salaries and expenses, the same as was enacted for fiscal year 2019, allowing ANC to continue their current level of services.

American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC)  The bill includes $84.1 million for ABMC, an increase of $9 million over the fiscal year 2020 budget request. These funds will support unfunded requirements for high-priority projects.

Armed Forces Retirement Home (AFRH)  The bill provides $75.3 million, an increase of $11 million above the fiscal year 2020 budget request and the fiscal year 2019 enacted level. The increase will support urgently needed capital projects, such as roof replacement, elevator repair, and electric system modernization.

Natural Disasters – The agreement provides $6.3 billion for to repair damage incurred at military installations from damage related to hurricanes, flooding, earthquakes, and tornadoes.

Additional Items –

  • The bill does not include backfill or pre-backfill of the border wall.

Division G – State & Foreign Operations

Overview:

The State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs bill funds the Department of State, the United States Agency for International Development, and other international programs and activities.

In total, the fiscal year 2020 bill provides $54.7 billion in discretionary funding, including $8 billion in Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism (OCO/GWOT) funding. This is $467 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $11.3 billion above the President’s request.

Bill Summary:

State Department Operations and Related Agencies – The bill contains a total of $16.6 billion for State Department Operations, which is $261 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $2.9 billion above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the legislation provides $6.1 billion for Embassy and Diplomatic Security, the same as fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $659 million above the President’s budget request. These funds will address needs at more than 275 diplomatic facilities overseas, including facility upgrades and security personnel and equipment.

International Security Assistance – The bill provides a total of $9 billion for international security assistance, which is $139 million below the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $1.6 billion above the President’s budget request.

U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Operations – The bill provides $1.66 billion in total funding for USAID and the USAID Office of Inspector General, which is $146.6 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $118 million above the President’s budget request. 

Bilateral Economic Assistance – The legislation contains a total of $26 billion for bilateral assistance to foreign countries and prioritizes development assistance, democracy, global health, and humanitarian assistance. 

  • This includes $9.1 billion for Global Health, $3 billion in Economic Support Fund, and $3.4 billion in Development Assistance, which is a $400 million increase over last year. 

Multilateral Assistance – The bill includes a total of $2.1 billion to meet U.S. commitments to multilateral organizations and international financial institutions, which is $200.6 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $560 million above the President’s budget request.

Maintains funding for critical programs & organizations:

President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), including Global Fund:

  • $5.9 billion for PEPFAR, $210 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $1.6 billion above the President’s budget request. This includes $1.56 billion for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, $602 million above the President’s budget request, maintaining U.S. leadership during the sixth replenishment.
  • The bill reinforces the United States’ commitment to its 33% share to the Global Fund, unlike the President’s budget request, which proposes reducing U.S. contributions to 25%.

Other Global Health Programs:

  • $3.2 billion for programs to improve maternal and child health and fight infectious diseases, which is $45 million above the 2019 enacted level and $1.1 billion above the President’s budget request. This also includes $575 million for family planning programs, and increases funds for the following programs:
    • $851 million for Maternal and Child Health, which is $16 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level, and includes $290 million for the GAVI Alliance;
    • $310 million to fight tuberculosis, which is $8 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level;
    • $770 million to combat malaria, which is $15 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level; and
    • $150 million for nutrition programs, which is $5 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level.

International Basic Education:

  • $875 million for basic education, which is $75 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level, and includes $100 million for the Global Partnership for Education and $25 million for Education Cannot Wait.

Education and Cultural Exchanges:

  • $730.7 million for education and cultural exchanges, which is $29.8 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $421 million above the President’s budget request.

Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Assistance:

$7.8 billion, which is $9.2 million above fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $1.5 billion above the President’s budget request.  This includes:

  • International Disaster Assistance (IDA)—$4.4 billion, which is $10 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level.
  • Refugee Assistance (MRA) —$3.43 billion, which is level to the fiscal year 2019 enacted level.

Peace Corps:

  • $410.5 million for the Peace Corps, which is equal to the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $14.3 million above the President’s budget request.

National Endowment for Democracy (NED):

  • $300 million for the NED, which is $120 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $232.7 million above the President’s budget request.

Environment:

  • $315 million for biodiversity - $30 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $236.1 million above President’s budget request
  • $100.7 million for combatting wildlife trafficking - $10 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $67.7 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $135 million for sustainable landscapes - $10 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $96.7 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $15 million for nature conservation, including the protection of coral reefs, reauthorized under the Tropical Forest Conservation Act of 2018.
  • Includes designated amounts for adaptation at $177 million and renewable energy at $179 million for the first time.

Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC):

  • $905 million for the MCC, which is equal to the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $105 million above the President’s budget request.

U.S. Agency for Global Media (formerly the Broadcasting Board of Governors, or BBG):

  • $810.4 million for USAGM, which is $2.5 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $180.3 million above the President’s budget request.

United States International Development Finance Corporation (DFC):

  • $299 million in new budget authority, including $150 million for equity authority, for the DFC—a new agency authorized through the BUILD Act of 2018 to mobilize private capital in the economic development of less developed countries

Contributions to International Organizations and Peacekeeping:

  • Contributions to International Organizations (CIO) – $1.47 billion for assessed contributions to international organizations, which is $113.5 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $460 million above the President’s budget request.
  • Contributions to International Peacekeeping (CIPA) – $1.5 billion, which is $24.6 million below the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $390 million above the President’s budget request.

The bill does not eliminate or reduce several partner organizations, as proposed in the President’s budget request, and instead provides:

  • The Asia Foundation - $19 million, which is $2 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level;
  • The U.S. African Development Foundation - $33 million, which is $3 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level;
  • The Inter-American Foundation - $37.5 million, which is $15 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level, including $10 million for programs in the Northern Triangle countries;
  • East-West Center - $16.7 million, which is equal to the fiscal year 2019 enacted level;
  • U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) - $45 million, which is $6.4 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level; and
  • Trade and Development Agency - $79.5 million, which is equal to the fiscal year 2019 enacted level

Support for U.S. allies and partners, including: (amounts are included in account totals above)

  • Israel: $3.3 billion, fulfilling the MOU
  • Jordan: $1.52 billion, fulfilling the MOU
  • Ukraine: $448 million
  • Georgia: $132 million
  • Assistance for Eastern Europe and Eurasia: $770.3 million
  • Countering Russian Influence Fund (CRIF): $290 million
  • Central America: $520 million for fiscal year 2020 and modifies the language in the fiscal year 2019 legislation to provide $528 million
  • Caribbean Basin Regional Security Initiative: $60 million
  • Colombia: $448.3 million
  • Mexico: $157.9 million
  • Democracy and the rule of law in Venezuela: Not less than $30 million
  • Tibet: $18 million
  • Countering Chinese Influence Fund: $300 million for a new Congressional initiative to counter the influence of the People’s Republic of China globally

Policy Provisions –

  • Less flexibility for the Administration to deviate from Congressionally-directed spending levels.
  • Reforms mandating that funding be provided to implementing agencies more quickly and reliably
  • Reverses the impact of the Administration’s hiring freeze and restores State Department and USAID personnel to 2016 levels.
  • The bill provides $75 million for security assistance programs for the West Bank and $75 million for the humanitarian and development needs of the Palestinian people in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.

Division H – Transportation-Housing & Urban Development

Overview:

The Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies bill funds the Department of Transportation, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and related agencies, including the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness.

In total, the FY 2020 legislation provides $135.6 billion in budgetary resources, $1.2 billion below the 2019 enacted level and $15.8 billion above the President’s budget request. The bill includes $74.3 billion in discretionary funding, an increase of $3.2 billion over the 2019 enacted level and $15.8 billion over the President’s 2020 budget request.

The bill invests in America’s infrastructure, improves transportation safety, protects vulnerable populations, builds resilience to climate change, and expands access to safe, affordable, and fair housing.

Bill Summary:

Department of Transportation (DOT)  The bill provides $86.2 billion in total budgetary resources for DOT, $324.9 million below the 2019 enacted level and $3.3 billion above the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • $1 billion for National Infrastructure Investments (TIGER/BUILD), $100 million above the 2019 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request. The bill ensures parity between urban and rural awards.
     
  • $5 million to start a new Highly Automated Systems Safety Center of Excellence. This program was not in the 2019 enacted bill or the President’s budget request.
     
  • $1 million to conduct a study on Transportation Resilience Metrics. This program was not in the 2019 enacted bill or the President’s budget request.
     
  • $17.6 billion for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), $166 million above the 2019 enacted level and $513 above the President’s budget request.
     
    • $1.4 billion for Aviation Safety, $67 million above the 2019 enacted level and $76 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $400 million for discretionary Airport Improvement Grants, $100 million below the 2019 enacted level and $400 million above the President’s budget request.
       
  • $49.3 billion for the Federal Highway Administration, $12.6 million above the 2019 enacted level and $2.1 billion above the President’s budget request.
     
    • $2.2 billion for discretionary Highway Infrastructure Programs, $1.1 billion below the 2019 enacted level and $1.9 billion above the President’s budget request.
       
      • $1.15 billion for a risk-based bridge rehabilitation and reconstruction program.
         
  • $679 million for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, $12 million above the 2019 enacted level and $3 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $989 million for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, $23 million above the 2019 enacted level and $60 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $2.8 billion for the Federal Railroad Administration, $80 million below the 2019 enacted level and $701 million above the President’s budget request.
     
    • $325 million for Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements, $70 million above the 2019 enacted level and $5 million below the President’s budget request.
       
    • $200 million for Federal-State Partnership for State of Good Repair, $200 million below the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
       
    • $2 billion for Amtrak, $58.4 million above the 2019 enacted level and $1.1 billion above the President’s budget request.
       
      • $700 million for Northeast Corridor Grants, $50 million above the 2019 enacted level and $374.5 million above the President’s budget request.
         
      • $1.3 billion for National Network Grants, $8.4 million above the 2019 enacted level and $689 million above the President’s budget request.
         
  • $12.9 billion for the Federal Transit Administration, $503 million below the 2019 enacted level and $494 million above the President’s budget request.
     
    • $2 billion for Capital Investment Grants, $575 million below the 2019 enacted level and $473 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $510 million for Transit Infrastructure Grants, $190 million below the 2019 enacted level and $10 million above the President’s budget request. This amount includes $75 million for low- and no-emission buses, and $8.5 million for areas of persistent poverty.
       
  • $38 million for the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation, $2 million above the 2019 enacted level and $10 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $1 billion for the Maritime Administration, $67.5 million below the 2019 enacted level and $390.4 million above the President’s budget request.
     
    • $300 million for the Maritime Security Program, equal to the 2019 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
       
    • $225 million for the Port Infrastructure Development Program, $67.7 million below the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request did not include funding for this program.
       
    • $300 million for schoolship construction, equal to the 2019 enacted level and $95 million above the President’s budget request.

Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)  The bill provides a total of $49.1 billion for HUD, $4.9 billion above the 2019 enacted level and $12.4 billion above the President’s budget request. FHA and GNMA receipts are $7.4 billion, $2.1 billion less in receipts than the 2019 enacted bill. Of the $49.1 billion, the bill includes:

  • $32.4 billion for the Office of Public and Indian Housing, $1.4 billion above the 2019 enacted level and $6.5 billion above the President’s budget request.
     
    • $23.9 billion for Tenant-based Rental Assistance, $1.3 billion above the 2019 enacted level and $1.6 billion above the President’s budget request.
       
      • $40 million for HUD/VA Supportive Housing for Homeless Veterans, equal to the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
         
      • $1 million for HUD/VA Supportive Housing for Homeless Native American Veterans, $3 million below the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
         
    • $2.9 billion for the Public Housing Capital Fund, $94.9 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
       
    • $4.5 billion for the Public Housing Operating Fund, $104 million below the 2019 enacted level and $1.7 billion above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $175 million for the Choice Neighborhoods Initiative, $25 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program. This is the highest funding level in the program’s history.
       
    • $130 million for Self-Sufficiency Programs, equal to the 2019 enacted level and $55 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $825 million for Native American Programs, $5 million above the 2019 enacted level and $225 million above the President’s budget request.
       
      • $70 million for Indian Community Development Block Grants, $5 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
         
  • $8 billion for the Office of Community Planning and Development, $319 million above the 2019 enacted level and $5.1 billion above the President’s budget request.
     
    • $410 million for Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS, $17 million above the 2019 enacted level and $80 million above the President’s budget request. This is the highest funding level in the program’s history.
       
    • $3.4 billion for Community Development Block Grants, $100 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
       
    • $1.35 billion for the HOME Investment Partnership Program, $100 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
       
    • $36 million for Section 4 Capacity Building, $1 million above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
       
    • $2.8 billion for Homeless Assistance Grants, $141 million above the 2019 enacted level and $178.4 million above the President’s budget request.
       
  • $13.6 billion for the Office of Housing, $956.8 million above the 2019 enacted level and $752 million above the President’s budget request.
     
    • $12.6 billion for Project-Based Rental Assistance, $823 million above the 2019 enacted level and $550 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $793 million for Housing for the Elderly, $115 million above the 2019 enacted level and $149 million above the President’s budget request. This includes $90 million for new construction.
       
    • $202 million for Housing for Persons with Disabilities, $17.8 million above the 2019 enacted level and $45 million above the President’s budget request. This includes $40 million for new construction.
       
    • $53 million for Housing Counseling, $3 million above the 2019 enacted level and $8 million above the President’s budget request.
       
  • $98 million for Policy Development and Research, $2 million above the 2019 enacted level and $11 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $70.3 million for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, $5 million above the 2019 enacted level and $8 million above the President’s budget request. The bill requires that grants be awarded within 180 days of enactment, and any outstanding FY 2019 grants be awarded within 90 days of enactment.
     
  • $290 million for the Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes, $11 million above the 2019 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request. This includes $50 million for the Healthy Homes Initiative, to address other health and safety hazards in the home, including carbon monoxide, asthma, mold, and radon.

Related Agencies – The bill provides $370 million for the related agencies in the bill, $9 million above the 2019 enacted level and $136 million above the President’s budget request.

  • $158.5 million for NeighborWorks, $6.5 million over the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
     
  • $3.8 million for the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, $200,000 above the 2019 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.

Policy Provisions –

  • Requires DOT to make awards for competitive funding appropriated in FY 2019 no later than May 1, 2020.
  • Prohibits a 12 percent (more than $1 billion) cut to transit formula funding in FY 2020.
  • Makes transit programs and alternative fuel infrastructure eligible for Surface Transportation Block Grant funding within Highway Infrastructure Programs.
  • Prohibits DOT from requiring Capital Investment Grant applicants from having a Federal share below 40 percent and eliminates the 51 percent cap on the Federal share of such grants, restoring the authorized 80 percent cap.
  • Extends the authorization by which DOT may provide direct loans or loan guarantees to transit-oriented development projects under the Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Financing program until September 30, 2020. This authority expired on December 4, 2019.
  • Strengthens protections for sexual assault and sexual harassment survivors at the US Merchant Marine Academy by requiring the Academy to seek concurrent jurisdiction with the State of New York.
  • Requires DOT to initiate and complete a rulemaking on the use of automatic and remote-controlled shut-off valves on transmission pipeline facilities and hazardous liquid pipeline facilities leak detection systems as required by the Pipeline Safety Act of 2011.
  • Prohibits the use of certain HUD funds until the Department issues the overdue Federal Register notice for Puerto Rico disaster mitigation funds.
  • Ensures that homeless programs continue to make progress toward ending homelessness by requiring HUD to use the FY 2018 Notice of Funding Availability when making funding awards.
  • Requires all HUD grantees to develop a resiliency plan as part of the consolidated planning process.
  • Prohibits Federal employees from using their public office for personal gain.

Authorizing Matters

In addition to the text of eight appropriations bills, the domestic priorities and international assistance minibus includes a number of other matter outside the Appropriations Committee’s jurisdiction and negotiated by bipartisan, bicameral leadership. The list below represents the other matter included in the bill and notes the committee of jurisdiction for each item.

DIVISION I – EXTENSIONS

Title I. Immigration Extensions. (Judiciary)

Title II. National Flood Insurance Program Extension. (Financial Services)

Title III. Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Extension. (Natural Resources)

Title IV. Export-Import Bank Extension. (Financial Services)

Title V. Terrorism Risk Insurance Program Extension. (Financial Services)

Title VI. NASA Enhanced Use Leasing Extension. (Science, Space and Technology)

Title VII. Iran, North Korea, and Syria Nonproliferation Act Extension. (Foreign Affairs)

Title VIII. Brand USA Extension. (Energy and Commerce)

Title IX. DC Opportunity Scholarship Extensions. (Oversight and Reform)

Title X. Budgetary Effects

DIVISION J – FOREIGN POLICY (Foreign Affairs)

Title I. Venezuela Emergency Relief, Democracy Assistance, and Development Act of 2019.

Title II. Eastern Mediterranean Security and Energy Partnership Act of 2019.

Title III. End Neglected Tropical Diseases Act.

Title IV. Preventing Child Marriage in Displaced Populations Act.

Title V. Global Fragility Act of 2019.

Title VI. Rescuing Animals With Rewards Act of 2019.

Title VII. Championing American Business Through Diplomacy Act of 2019.

Title VIII. United States Commission on International Religious Freedom Reauthorization Act of 2019.

Title IX. Other Matters.

Sec. 901: Special Rules for Certain Monthly Workers’ Compensation Payments and Other Payments for Department of State Personnel Under Chief of Mission Authority.

Sec. 902: Declassification of Information Related to Certain Actions By Saudi Arabian Officials.

Sec. 903: Promoting Security and Justice for Victims of Terrorism Act o 2019.

Sec. 904: Debt Relief for Somalia.

DIVISION K – NATIONAL LAW ENFORCEMENT MUSEUM COMMEMORATIVE COIN ACT (Financial Services)

DIVISION L – DHS CYBER HUNT AND INCIDENT RESPONSE TEAMS ACT OF 2019 (Homeland Security)

DIVISION M – BIPARTISAN AMERICAN MINERS ACT OF 2019 (Ways and Means)

DIVISION N – HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES EXTENDERS (Energy and Commerce

Title A—Medicare Provisions

Sec. 101. Extension of the work geographic index floor under the Medicare program.

Sec. 102. Extension of funding for quality measure endorsement, input, and selection.

Sec. 103. Extension of funding outreach and assistance for low-income programs.

Sec. 104. Extension of appropriations to the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund; extension of certain health insurance fees.

Sec. 105. Laboratory Access for Beneficiaries.

Sec. 106. Exclusion of complex rehabilitative manual wheelchairs from Medicare competitive acquisition program; non-application of Medicare fee-schedule adjustments for certain wheelchair accessories and cushions.

Sec. 107. Extending pass-through status for certain drugs under part B of the Medicare program.

Sec. 108. Hematopoietic stem cell acquisition payments.

Title B—Medicaid Provisions

Sec. 201. Extension of Community Mental Health Services demonstration program.

Sec. 202. Medicaid funding for the territories.

Sec. 203. Delay of DSH reductions.

Sec. 204. Extension of spousal impoverishment protections.

Sec. 205. Extension of the Money Follows the Person rebalancing demonstration program.

Title C—Human Services and Other Health Programs

Sec. 301. Extension of demonstration projects to address health professions workforce needs.

Sec. 302. Extension of the temporary assistance for needy families program and related programs.

Sec. 303. Extension of sexual risk avoidance education program.

Sec. 304. Extension of personal responsibility education program.

Title D—Public Health Provisions

Sec. 401. Extension for community health centers, the national health service corps, and teaching health centers that operate GME programs.

Sec. 402. Diabetes programs.

Sec. 403. Poison Center Network Enhancement.

Sec. 404. Kay Hagan Tick Act.

Title E—Revenue Provisions

Sec. 501. Repeal of medical device excise tax.

Sec. 502. Repeal of annual fee on health insurance providers.

Sec. 503. Repeal of excise tax on high cost employer-sponsored health coverage.

Title F—Miscellaneous Provisions

Sec. 601. Alaska native regional health entities.

Sec. 602. Addressing expiration of child welfare demonstration projects and supporting Family First implementation.

Sec. 603. Medicaid improvement fund.

Sec. 604 Minimum age of sale of tobacco products.

Sec. 605. Sale of tobacco products to individuals under the age of 21.

Sec. 606. Biological product definition.

Sec. 607. Protecting access to biological products.

Sec. 608. Streamlining the transition of biological products.

Sec. 609. Reenrollment of certain individuals in qualified health plans in certain Exchanges.

Sec. 610. Protection of silver loading practice.

Sec. 611. Actions for delays of generic drugs and biosimilar biological products.

DIVISION O – SETTING EVERY COMMUNITY UP FOR RETIREMENT ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2019 (Ways and Means and Education and Labor)

DIVISION P – OTHER MATTER

Title I. Platte River Recovery Implementation Program Extension Act. (Natural Resources)

Title II. Great Lakes. (Natural Resources)

Title III. Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation. (Natural Resources)

Title IV. White Horse Hill National Game Preserve Designation Act. (Natural Resources)

Title V. Modernizing the Pittman-Robertson Fund for Tomorrow’s Needs Act. (Natural Resources).

Title VI. John F. Kennedy Center Reauthorization Act of 2019. (Transportation and Infrastructure)

Title VII. Preserving America’s Battlefields Act. (Natural Resources)

Title VIII. Veterans Affairs Report on Disability Compensation and the Positive Association With Exposure to an Herbicide Agent. (Veterans Affairs)

Title IX. Disaster Recovery Workforce Act. (Natural Resources and Judiciary)

Title X. Television Viewer Protection Act of 2019. (Energy and Commerce)

Title XI. Satellite Television Community Protection and Promotion Act of 2019. (Energy and Commerce)

Title XII. Groundfish Trawl Fishery. (Natural Resources)

Title XIII. Temporary Relief from Certain ERISA Requirements. (Ways and Means)

Title XIV. Library of Congress Technical Corrections Act of 2019. (House Administration)

Title XV. Senate Entities. (House Administration)

Title XVI. Legislative Branch Inspectors General Independent Act of 2019. (House Administration)

Title XVII. Managing Political Fund Activity. (House Administration)

Title XVIII. Kentucky Wildlands National Heritage Area Study Act. (Natural Resources)

Title XIX. International Bank for Reconstruction and Development. (Financial Services)

Title XX. European Energy Security and Diversification Act of 2019. (Foreign Affairs)

116th Congress