House to Consider National Security Appropriations Minibus This Week

December 16, 2019
Press Release

WASHINGTON — In advance of Floor consideration this week, the House Appropriations Committee released a division-by-division summary of a national security appropriations minibus of four fiscal year 2020 appropriations bills. The House is expected to consider the legislation, H.R. 1158, on Tuesday, December 17.

The national security appropriations minibus reflects conference agreements for the Defense, Commerce-Justice-Science, Financial Services and General Government, and Homeland Security spending bills. 

A division-by-division summary of H.R. 1158 is below and available as a PDF here. Text of the minibus is available here. Text of joint explanatory statements is available at these links: front matterDivision ADivision BDivision CDivision D.

National Security Appropriations Minibus, H.R. 1158
DIVISION-BY-DIVISION SUMMARY

H.R. 1158 totals $860.3 billion and reflects conference agreements for the FY 2020 Defense, Commerce-Justice-Science, Financial Services and General Government, and Homeland Security appropriations bills.

In total, the package provides:

  • $630.6 billion in base defense funding;
  • $137.0 billion in base nondefense funding;
  • $70.9 billion for defense Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO);
  • $20.0 billion for nondefense disaster relief and additional census requirements; and
  • $1.8 billion for defense emergency requirements.

Table of Contents

Defense

Commerce-Justice-Science

Financial Services & General Government

Homeland Security

 

Division A – Defense

Overview:

The Defense bill funds the Department of Defense, including operations and maintenance, readiness activities, research and development, equipment modernization, and health and quality-of-life programs for our troops and military families.

The FY 2020 bill provides $693.3 billion in new, non-emergency discretionary spending authority for the Department of Defense for functions under the Defense Subcommittee’s jurisdiction, an increase of $18.9 billion above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level, and $4.6 billion below the request:

  • $622.7 billion in base funding, an increase of $16.2 billion above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $88.7 billion above the President’s request;
  • $70.7 billion for OCO/GWOT funding in title IX, an increase of $2.8 billion above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $93.3 billion below the President’s request.

In addition, the bill provides $1.8 billion in natural disaster funding for repairs and replacement of equipment at military bases damaged by natural disasters.

The bill provides investments needed to defend the nation against evolving threats, prepare for future challenges, and meet the needs of service members and military families.

Bill Summary:

Military Personnel

Total:                                                                $154.8 billion

Base:                                                                $150.3 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):                                   $4.5 billion

  • Funds active duty end strength of 1,339,500, an increase of 1,400 above current year and equal to the request. Funds reserve component end strength of 800,800, a decrease of 16,900 below current year and equal to the request. 
    • Army totals:  480,000 active duty, a decrease of 7,500 below current year and equal to the request; 189,500 reserve, a decrease of 10,000 below current year and equal to the request; and 336,000 Guard, a decrease of 7,500 below current year and equal to the request.
    • Navy totals:  340,500 active duty, an increase of 5,100 above current year and equal to the request; and 59,000 reserve, a decrease of 100 below current year and equal to the request.
    • Marine Corps totals:   186,200 active duty, an increase of 100 above current year and equal to the request; and 38,500 reserve, equal to current year and the request.
    • Air Force totals:  332,800 active duty, an increase of 3,700 above current year and equal to the request; 70,100 reserve, an increase of 100 above current year and equal to the request; and 107,700 Guard, an increase of 600 above current year and equal to the request.
  • Provides full funding necessary to support the proposed 3.1 percent military pay raise.
  • Increases funding above the request for the Department and Services’ Sexual Assault Prevention and Response programs for a total of $294 million, an increase of $35 million above the request.

Operation and Maintenance

Total:                                                                $254.2 billion

Base:                                                                 $199.4 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):                                  $53.9 billion

Disaster (title X)                                             $0.9 billion

  • Provides an additional $625 million for ship depot maintenance for the USS Boise, USS Hartford and USS Columbus.  
  • Provides $9.7 billion to fund SOCOM’s operation and maintenance requirements.
  • Provides $1.42 billion for Environmental Restoration activities, $344 million above the request, and $180.5 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level.
  • Provides $172 million above the request for PFOS/PFOA, including $10M to continue the nation-wide CDC study and assessment of the health impacts of PFAS exposure.
  • Provides $315 million above the request to address public school infrastructure requirements on DoD installations, a $45 million increase above the fiscal year 2019 level.
  • Provides an additional $110 million for upgrades to childcare facilities and report language directing the Services to present innovative ideas to assist servicemembers with this quality of life issue.
  • Provides $40 million for the Space Force. 
  • Provides increases for National Guard Youth Challenge ($50m); and Starbase ($35 million).
  • Provides $50 million for the Defense Community Infrastructure Program and $25 million for the Defense Manufacturing Communities.
  • Provides $50 million for Impact Aid, a $10 million increase from fiscal year 2019 and $20 million for Impact Aid for those with disabilities, also a $10 million increase from fiscal year 2019.
  • Provides $7 million for gender advisor programs.
  • Provides report language supporting the 90/10 rule.
  • Provides $44.5 million for the Procurement Technical Assistance Program.

Procurement

Total:                                                                $146.1 billion

Base:                                                                 $133.9 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):                                   $ 11.8 billion

Disaster (title X)                                              $0.4 billion                                                                   

 

Aircraft

  • Funds the request of 24 F/A-18E/F Super Hornet aircraft ($1.7 billion).
  • Funds 98 F-35 aircraft, 20 more than the request, including 62 F-35As, 16 F-35Bs, and 20 F-35Cs ($9.3 billion).
  • Funds eight F-15EX aircraft to recapitalize the F-15C/D fleet ($1.1 billion).
  • Funds 74 UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters, 16 more than the fiscal year 2019 enacted level ($1.4 billion), including one additional aircraft above the request for the National Guard to replace a training loss.
  • Funds the request of 12 KC-46 tankers ($2.1 billion).
  • Funds 26 MQ-9 Reaper air vehicles, 11 more than the request ($522 million).
  • Funds 49 remanufactured AH-64 Apache helicopters ($827 million), which is one aircraft above the request to replace a battlefield loss.
  • Funds the request of six MQ-1 Gray Eagles ($54 million) and adds $90 million above the request for additional aircraft.
  • Funds 14 V-22 aircraft, four more than the request ($1.2 billion).
  • Funds nine P-8A Poseidon aircraft, three more than the request ($1.7 billion).
  • Funds 20 C/MC/KC-130J aircraft, eight more than the request, including an additional four C-130Js for the Air Force Reserve and an additional four C-130Js for the Air National Guard ($1.8 billion).
  • Funds six E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft, two more than the request ($1.07 billion).
  • Funds the request of six CH-53K helicopters ($847 million)
  • Funds the request of six VH-92 executive helicopters ($641 million).
  • Funds 12 Combat Rescue helicopters ($851 million).
  • Provides long-lead funding for the CH-47 Chinook Block II upgrade to ensure that Army stays on schedule with the program of record.

Shipbuilding

  • Provides $24 billion to procure 14 Navy ships.
  • Funds are provided for three DDG-51 guided missile destroyers, two SSN-774 attack submarines, one Frigate, one Ford class aircraft carrier, two TAO fleet oilers, two towing, salvage, and rescue ships, one LHA replacement, one Expeditionary Fast Transport, and one LPD.
  • Funds advance procurement of the first Columbia Class submarine ($1.8 billion).
  • Funds advance procurement for Virginia Class submarines ($3 billion).
  • Funds one Ship to Shore Connector, one more than the request ($65 million).

Vehicles/Force Protection

  • Provides $249 million above the request to upgrade the Stryker vehicle by procuring 86 Stryker weapon systems (30mm cannons and weapon stations).
  • Fully funds the budget request of $1.7 billion for Abrams M1A2 SEPv3 upgrades.
  • Funds the requested 131 Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicles ($480 million).
  • Fully funds the budget request of $553.4 million for the Paladin Integrated Management program.
  • Provides an additional $100 million for Army National Guard HMMWV modernization.

Other

  • Provides $1.24 billion for four National Security Space Launch services
  • $414 million to procure one GPS IIIF spacecraft
  • Provides $200 million to fully support Israeli Cooperative procurement programs (Iron Dome, David’s Sling, and Arrow).
  • Includes $388.5 million to procure 37 THAAD interceptors, a decrease of $37.3 million after unit cost savings.
  • Restores Army reductions for the Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles ($66 million), Heavy Expanded Mobile Tactical Truck ($101 million), and Advanced Medium Mobile Power Sources program ($54.9 million).
  • Includes $1.3 billion for the National Guard and Reserve Equipment Account (NGREA).

Research, Development, Test and Evaluation

Total:                                                                $105.3 billion

Base:                                                                 $104.4 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):                                   $0.8 billion

Disaster (title X):                                            $0.1 billion

  • Invests in basic and applied scientific research, development, test and evaluation of new technologies and equipment, and supports the research community so forces will have the systems and equipment for tomorrow’s challenges.

Aircraft

  • Funds the continued development of the Air Force’s B-21 bomber program ($3 billion).
  • Fully funds development of the VC-25B Presidential Aircraft Replacement ($758 million).
  • Provides $505.9 million for Future Vertical Lift, including an additional $75.6 million to accelerate the Future Long Range Assault Aircraft.
  • Fully funds the Army’s Improved Turbine Engine Program ($206 million).
  • Fully funds the continued development and testing of the CH-53K helicopter ($507 million).

Shipbuilding

  • Funds the continued development of the Columbia class ballistic missile submarine ($427 million).

Vehicles and Ground Forces

  • Fully funds the Army’s number one priority of Long Range Precision Fires ($418 million).
  • Fully funds and provides an additional $150.6 million for hypersonics to develop a common hypersonic glide body.
  • Provides $379.8 million for the Lower-Tier Air and Missile Defense Sensor.

Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA)

  • Funds DARPA at $3.46 billion.

Other

  • Provides $300 million for the Israeli cooperative research and development programs, including David’s Sling and Arrow-3.
  • Provides $448 million for the Global Positioning System IIIF program.
  • Provides $445 million for the Global Positioning System III Operational Control Segment.
  • Provides $432 million for National Security Space Launch to develop new U.S. space launch vehicles.
  • Provides $1.47 billion for Next Generation Overhead Persistent Infrared.
  • Provides $205 million for future weather satellites.
  • Provides $363 million for space situational awareness.
  • Provides an additional $62 million for university research initiatives for each military department.
  • Provides an additional $20 million in research funding for Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Revolving and Management Funds

Total:                                                                $1.78 billion

Base Requirements:                                      $1.56 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):                                   $0.02 billion

Disaster (title X):                                            $0.2 billion

  • Fully funds the Defense Working Capital Fund request for War Reserve material and commissary operations.
  • Fully funds the Defense Commissary Agency to ensure servicemembers and their families receive continued savings for food and household goods as part of the military pay and benefits package.
  • Fully funds the establishment and operation of the Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency in its lead role for conducting personnel security investigations for the vast majority of the Federal workforce and associated industrial contractors. 

Other Department of Defense Programs

Total:                                                 $36.8 billion

Base Requirements:                        $36.3 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX)                      $0.5 billion

Defense Health Programs

  • $34 billion plus $347.7 million for OCO/GWOT Requirements.
  • Adds $492.5 million for cancer research. The total amount is distributed as follows:
    • $150 million for the breast cancer research program;
    • $6 million for the pancreatic cancer research program;
    • $110 million for the prostate cancer research program;
    • $35 million for the ovarian cancer research program;
    • $40 million for the kidney cancer research program;
    • $14 million for the lung cancer research program;
    • $20 million for the melanoma research program;
    • $7.5 million for the rare cancer research program; and
    • $110 million for the cancer research program.
  • Adds $165 million for the peer-reviewed psychological health and traumatic brain injury research program.
  • Adds $40 million for spinal cord research.
  • Adds $40 million for the joint warfighter medical research program.

Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction

  • $985.5 million, as requested.

Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid

  • $135 million, including increases for foreign disaster relief, humanitarian assistance, and full funding for the authorized level for humanitarian demining.

Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities

  • $893 million in base funding and $153 million for OCO/GWOT.
  • Adds $65 million for the National Guard Counter-Drug Program.
  • $5 million for the National Commission on Combatting Synthetic Opioid Trafficking.

Office of the Inspector General

  • $363.5 million in base funding and $24.3 million for OCO/GWOT requirements, as requested.

General Provisions

  • Includes $4.1 billion in prior year rescissions plus $1.1 billion in rescissions from prior year OCO/GWOT funding.
  • Includes $315 million for public schools on military installations.
  • Continues provisions prohibiting the transfer of Guantanamo detainees to the U.S. and limiting the transfer of detainees to other countries except under certain conditions (including assessment of that the detainee is no longer a threat to U.S. security).
  • Includes a provision conditioning expenditures to include the Government of Afghanistan and not restrict the participation of women for Taliban participation for reconciliation activities.
  • Provides that nothing in this Act may be construed as authorizing the use of force against Iran.
  • Includes various Buy America provisions

Global War on Terrorism (GWOT)

  • Includes $4.2 billion for the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund, $604 million below the request.
  • Not less than $10 million for recruitment and retention of women and the recruitment and training of female security personnel.
  • Prohibits funds for the Taliban except support for reconciliation activities that also include Afghan government, do not restrict the participation of women, and are authorized by law.
  • No funds for Afghanistan security personnel who are not enrolled in the Afghanistan Personnel and Pay System.  No more payments to so-called ‘ghost soldiers.’
  • $1.2 billion for the Counter-ISIS Train and Equip Fund, including support for the Kurdish Peshmerga and the Syrian Democratic Forces. Requires the Secretary of Defense to vet and receive commitments from elements to promote respect for human rights and the rule of law. Also includes $250 million to support border security of countries affected by ISIS.
  • $250 million for the Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative, as requested, including $50 million for lethal assistance. Requires the Department to notify Congress of any undue spending delays.   
  • $799 million for security assistance for other partner countries such as Colombia and Jordan, which is in addition to $444 million provided in base funding.  
  • $250 million for the ISR transfer fund to address near-term gaps in existing ISR capabilities.

Title X

  • Provides a total of $1.8 billion for disaster relief due to hurricanes, earthquakes, flooding and other natural disasters in Virginia, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, California, Nebraska, Alaska, and Georgia.

Classified Programs

  • Details are provided under separate cover.

Congressional Oversight

  • Prohibits the transfer of F-35 fighters to Turkey to prevent the exposure of cutting-edge U.S. technology to Russian missile systems.
  • Adjusts funding and includes reporting requirements to ensure that Congress is more fully informed about the new Space Force.

Division B – Commerce-Justice-Science

Overview:

The Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies bill funds the Departments of Commerce and Justice, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and other related agencies.

The FY 2020 bill provides $73.18 billion in discretionary funding, an increase of $9 billion above the FY2019 enacted level. The total amount includes a $2.5 billion cap adjustment for the Census Bureau as it conducts the 2020 Decennial Census this fiscal year. 

The bill provides a critical funding increase for the Census Bureau to conduct the 2020 Decennial Census. The bill additionally provides strong funding increases to help create jobs; fix the country’s infrastructure; support U.S. manufacturing; research and prepare for climate change; promote civil rights; address the opioid crisis; and help keep schools safe. Furthermore, the bill provides strong funding increases for science research, science education, and legal services for underserved communities.

Bill Summary:

U.S. Department of Commerce – $15.2 billion in overall discretionary funding for the Department of Commerce, an increase of $3.81 billion above the FY 2019 enacted level and $2.75 billion above the President’s budget request.

  • International Trade Administration (ITA) – $521.25 million, $26.25 million above the FY 2019 enacted level and $50.2 million above the President’s budget request. The total includes no less than $333 million for ITA Global Markets, $55 million above the request and $13 million above FY 2019, to help create jobs here at home by increasing U.S. exports.
  • Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) – $127.65 million, an increase of $9.6 million above FY 2019.
  • Economic Development Administration (EDA) – $333 million, an increase of $29 million above FY 2019. This includes $118.5 million for EDA’s Public Works program, which supports brick-and-mortar projects in distressed communities across the nation, and $33 million for the Regional Innovation Program, an increase of $9.5 million, to help create jobs by establishing and expanding region-focused innovative technology business endeavors. Additionally, $2 million is provided for a new pilot project for STEM Apprenticeships to help align the skills of workers and the needs of employers. The President had proposed completely eliminating EDA.
     
  • Minority Business Development Administration (MBDA) – $42 million, an increase of $2 million above FY 2019, is provided for MBDA to support minority businesses around the country. The President proposed reducing support for minority businesses through MBDA by $30 million.
  • Census Bureau – The bill provides $7.56 billion in new discretionary funding, an increase of more than $3.7 billion above FY 2019 and $1.4 billion above the President’s budget request, to enable the Bureau to effectively prepare for and conduct a thorough and accurate 2020 Decennial Census. 
  • U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) — $3.45 billion, equal to the President’s budget request.
  • Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Program — $146 million, $6 million above FY2019. The President had proposed eliminating this program.
  • NOAA Climate Research — $169.5 million, an increase of $10.5 million above FY 2019 and $82 million above the President’s budget request. Additionally, an increase of $14 million is provided to expand supercomputing and cloud computing capacity for climate and weather research.
     
  • NOAA’s National Ocean Service (NOS) – $599 million for NOS operations, an increase of $17 million above FY 2019, including $33 million for the National Oceans and Coastal Security Fund (an increase of $3 million, or 10%); a $1 million increase for the Marine Debris program; a $1.9 million increase for the Coral Reef Program; and a new dedicated carve out of $10 million for research to combat harmful algal blooms.
  • National Weather Service — $1.07 billion for operating expenses, an increase of $45 million above FY 2019. In addition, this Act fully funds efforts to procure future weather satellites, which are essential for accurate weather forecasting.

U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) – $32.6 billion overall for the Department of Justice, which is $1.67 billion above the FY2019 enacted level and $2 billion above the President’s budget request.

  • Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crimes Reauthorization Act of 2016 —$13.5 million is provided, as authorized under the Act, including: $5 million within the Civil Rights Division; $5 million within the Federal Bureau of Investigation; $1.5 million within the Community Relations Service; and $2 million within State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance.
     
  • Legal Orientation Program – $18 million is provided, an increase of $6.6 million above FY 2019, for this program that helps individuals navigate their way through immigration court processes. Within the total, $3 million is provided for the Immigration Help Desk.
     
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation – $9.95 billion, an increase of $376 million above the FY 2019 enacted level and $644 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) – $1.4 billion, an increase of $83.3 million above the FY 2019 enacted level and $31.6 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) – $7.78 billion, an increase of $264 million above the FY 2019 enacted level and $617 million above the President’s budget request, including $75 million, as authorized under the First Step Act of 2018, to expand and develop opportunities for incarcerated individuals to participate in evidence-based, recidivism-reducing programming and productive activities.
     
  • Grants to State and Local Law Enforcement – $3.28 billion is provided, an increase of $245.5 million above FY 2019. This includes: $547.2 million for Byrne JAG; $340 million for the Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Program; $180 million to address sexual assault kit and other DNA evidence backlogs; $90 million for Second Chance Act programs; $378 million for grant programs to address the opioid crisis; $125 million for the STOP School Violence Act; $502.5 million for Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) programs; and $78.3 million for grants to improve the NICS firearms background check system.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) – $22.63 billion is provided, an increase of $1.13 billion above the FY 2019 enacted level, including:

  • $1.97 billion for Earth Science, an increase of $40 million above the FY2019 enacted level and $192 million above the President’s budget request, to enable better scientific information about the Earth and its changing climate, and rejecting cuts proposed by the Administration aimed at eliminating climate science missions. 
  • $783.9 million for Aeronautics research, an increase of $59 million above FY 2019 and $117 million above the President’s budget request, to continue efforts to improve passenger safety, fuel efficiency, and noise reduction, and to make air travel more environmentally sustainable.   
  • $120 million for NASA’s STEM Engagement educational efforts, an increase of $10 million above FY 2019, to enable NASA to inspire young people to pursue future careers in science and engineering. This amount includes funding increases for the Space Grant program, Minority University Research and Education Project, and Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCOR). The President had proposed eliminating all funding for STEM Engagement.

National Science Foundation (NSF) – $8.28 billion, an increase of $203.3 million above the FY2019 enacted level and $1.2 billion above the President’s budget request.

  • NSF Research and Related Activities — $6.74 billion is provided, an increase of $217.2 million above FY 2019 and $1.07 billion above the President’s budget request.

Legal Services Corporation – $440 million, $25 million above the FY2019 enacted level. The President had proposed eliminating this program, which helps provide legal assistance to underserved communities.

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission – $389.5 million, $10 million above the FY2019 enacted level and $33.7 million above the President’s budget request.

International Trade Commission (ITC) – $99.4 million, $4.4 million above the FY2019 enacted level and $8.3 million above the President’s budget request, to enable ITC to meet statutory requirements under the American Manufacturing Competitiveness Act of 2016.

Crime Victims Fund – $2.64 billion for victims and for victim services, including a Tribal set-aside of over $132 million for programs to assist Native American victims of crime.

Division C – Financial Services & General Government

Overview:

The Financial Services and General Government bill provides annual funding for the Department of the Treasury, the Judiciary, the Executive Office of the President, and other independent agencies, including the Small Business Administration.

In total, the FY 2020 bill includes $23.83 billion in discretionary funding, an increase of $673.3 million over the FY 2019 enacted level and $366.2 million below the President’s FY 2020 budget request. 

The FY 2020 Financial Services and General Government bill includes funding for a broad range of functions and services in both the Executive and Judicial branches that are essential to the operation of the Federal Government. In addition, the bill supports programs that assist and protect the public, such as shielding consumers from defective and dangerous products, assisting small businesses, and investing in distressed communities.

Bill Summary:

Department of the Treasury – $13.06 billion, $297 million above the FY 2019 enacted level and $349 million above the President’s budget request (not including program integrity).

  • Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) Fund – Establishes a new CFIUS Fund account and provides $20 million to support expanded CFIUS program responsibilities and enforcement efforts.
     
  • Terrorism and Financial Intelligence (TFI) and Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN)  Provides $169.7 million for TFI, an increase of $10.7 million above FY 2019, including $3 million (an increase of $1 million above FY 2019) for enhanced enforcement of human rights and corruption violations, and $126 million for FinCEN, $8.2 million above FY 2019 and $1.3 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • Savings Bond Digitization – Provides $25 million for a new effort to digitize savings bonds records dating back to World War II, to enable Americans to redeem more than $24 billion in matured savings bonds left unclaimed in the U.S. Treasury.
     
  • Treasury Inspector General – Provides $41 million for the Treasury Inspector General, an increase of $4 million above FY 2019 and the President’s budget request.
     
  • Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI) – Includes $262 million, an increase of $12 million above FY 2019 and $248 million more than the President’s budget request. Within the total, funding is included for two new programs: $5 million for a new Small Dollar Loan Program and $2 million for the Economic Mobility Corps.  
     
  • IRS  Includes $11.51 billion, an increase of $207.5 million above FY 2019 and $38 million above the President’s budget request (not including program integrity).
     
    • Taxpayer Services: $2.51 billion, an increase of $20 million above the FY 2019 level. Grant programs funded within the total include:
       
      • Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, $25 million, an increase of $7 million;
      • Tax Counseling of the Elderly, $11 million, an increase of $1.1 million;
      • Low Income Taxpayer Clinic Grants, $12 million, equal to FY 2019; and
      • National Taxpayer Advocate, $209 million, an increase of $2 million.
         
    • Enforcement: $5 billion, an increase of $150 million
       
    • Operations Support: $3.81 billion, an increase of $84.5 million
       
    • Business Systems Modernization: $180 million, an increase of $30 million
       
  • Executive Office of the President – $726.9 million, $11.9 million below the FY 2019 level and $396.5 above the President’s budget request.
     
    • Office of Management and Budget (OMB)  Includes $101.6 million, $1.4 million below the FY 2019 level and $0.4 million below the President’s budget request. Rejects additional funding for OMB to assume human resource policy functions from the Office of Personnel Management.
       
    • Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator (IPEC) – Transfers funding for IPEC out of OMB into a new appropriation.
       
    • Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) – Rejects Administration’s proposed transfer or elimination of ONDCP grant programs and includes:
       
  • $285 million for the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas Program, an increase of $5 million above FY 2019; and
     
  • $101.3 million for the Drug-Free Communities Program, an increase of $1.3 million above FY 2019.

The Judiciary – $7.48 billion in discretionary funding, $234 million above the FY 2019 level and $138 million below the President’s budget request.

  • Defender Services – Includes $1.23 billion, an increase of $84 million above the FY 2019 level and equal to the budget request.
  • Court Security – $639 million, an increase of $32 million above the FY 2019 level and $2.1 million below the budget request.

District of Columbia – $714.3 million, $11 million below the FY2019 level and $2.3 below the President’s budget request. 

  • D.C. Resident Tuition Support  Rejects the President’s proposal to terminate the program and includes $40 million, equal to the FY 2019 level.
     
  • HIV/AIDS Testing and Treatment  Includes $4 million, an increase of $1 million above the FY 2019 level.
     
  • D.C. Emergency Planning and Security Costs – Includes $18 million, an increase of $6 million above the FY 2019 level.
     
  • D.C. Water and Sewer Authority  Includes $8 million, equal to FY 2019 and $8 million above the President’s budget request.

Independent Agencies – $1.86 billion, $132.8 above the FY 2019 level and $962 million below the President’s budget request. In addition, the bill includes $150.9 million in a disaster cap adjustment for SBA Disaster Loans.

  • Consumer Product and Safety Commission  Includes $132.5 million, an increase of $5.5 million above FY 2019 and the budget request. Within the total, $1.3 million is included for Virginia Graeme Baker Pool Safety grants.
     
  • Election Assistance Commission – Includes $425 million for a new round of election security grants to improve the security and integrity of elections for Federal office. Also includes $15.2 million for EAC operating expenses, an increase of $6 million above FY 2019, to restore staffing and other resources to enable the EAC to improve their support to states in advance of the 2020 elections and beyond.
     
  • Federal Trade Commission (FTC)  Includes $331 million for FTC salaries and expenses, an increase of more than $20 million over FY 2019, for both antitrust activities and more enforcement of privacy and other consumer protection issues.
     
  • General Services Administration Construction and Acquisition – Includes $152.4 million for construction of the San Luis, AZ Land Port of Entry.
     
  • General Services Administration Repairs and Alterations – Includes $833.8 million combined for Basic and Major Repairs, including $451.7 million for Major Repairs and Alterations and $382.1 million for Basic Repairs. This is an increase of $170.5 million above FY 2019 and $828.6 million below the President’s budget request.
     
  • General Services Administration Pre-election Transition Services – Includes $9.2 million to prepare for a Presidential Transition in 2020-21.
     
  • National Archives and Records Administration – Includes $359 million for NARA operating expenses, an increase of $13.2 million above the FY 2019 level and $13.4 million above the President’s budget request.
     
    • Includes $2 million for implementation of the Civil Rights Cold Case Record Collections Act of 2018.
       
    • Funding for the National Historical Publications & Records Commission Grants Program increased to $6.5 million.
  • Office of Personnel Management – Includes $330 million, an increase of $34.1 million above the FY 2019 level. The additional funds are needed to compensate for anticipated lost revenue due to the FY 2020 transfer of the background investigation bureau to the Pentagon. Within the total, $14 million is included for OPM IT systems and modernization.
  • Small Business Administration – Includes $847.6 million for SBA, an increase of $132.2 million above the FY2019 enacted level. In addition, the bill provides $150.9 million in disaster cap adjustment funds for SBA Disaster Loans.
     
    • Includes $261 million for Entrepreneurial Development Programs, an increase of $13.3 million above the FY 2019 level, including:
       
      • $135 million (a $4 million increase) for Small Business Development Centers;
      • $22.5 million (a $4 million increase) for Women’s Business Centers;
      • $34.5 million (a $3.5 million increase) for Microloan Technical Assistance; and
      • $19 million (a $1 million increase) for the State Trade Expansion Program (STEP) program.
         
  • Securities and Exchange Commission  Includes $1.815 billion for SEC salaries and expenses, an increase of $140 million above the FY 2019 level and $69 million above the President’s budget request. The additional funds are provided to bolster SEC’s enforcement, compliance, and market oversight activities.

Policy Provisions –

  • The bill preserves 6-day postal delivery.
  • The bill provides a 3.1 percent pay raise for federal civilian employees for calendar year 2020.
  • The bill eliminates a longstanding provision that restricts the IRS from creating a pre-populated return.
  • The bill includes new language prioritizing CDFI awards to persistent poverty counties.
  • The bill includes a new provision requiring OMB to notify all Federal agencies of their obligations to comply with government-wide provisions in Title VII of the FSGG bill.
  • The bill contains enhanced reporting requirements related to reprogrammings.
  • The bill includes a new restriction on public relations contracts over $5,000 unless advance notice is provided to the Appropriations Committees.
  • The explanatory statement accompanying the bill contains new language requiring the Consumer Product Safety Commission to produce a detailed assessment of the safety hazards of strollers, residential elevators, inclined sleepers, and other products highlighted by news reports over the past year.
  • The bill rejects a Senate requirement that the FTC submit a report on potential political biases in social media algorithms, a directive outside of the FTC’s jurisdiction and that raises Constitutional concerns.  

Division D – Homeland Security

Overview:

The Homeland Security bill provides annual funding for the Department of Homeland Security and its related agencies.

The bill provides $67.8 billion in net discretionary resources, including $48.1 billion for non-defense programs; $2.4 billion for defense-related programs; and $17.4 billion for major disaster response and recovery activities. When excluding major disaster funding, the total provided in the bill is $50.5 billion, which is $1.2 billion below the budget request and $1.1 billion above the FY 2019 enacted level, including an increase of $325 million for cybersecurity and infrastructure security activities.

Bill Summary:

Office of the Secretary – The bill provides $168.8 million for the Office of the Secretary and executive management, including:

  • $10 million to establish a new Office of Immigration Detention Ombudsman with responsibility for receiving, investigating, and resolving complaints regarding misconduct by DHS personnel and violations of the rights of individuals in DHS custody, including through unannounced inspections of detention facilities; and
     
  • $20.3 million for the Office of Targeted Violence and Terrorism Prevention, including $10 million to be transferred to FEMA for a related grant program.

Departmental Management – The bill provides $1.56 billion for the Management Directorate, an increase of $301 million above the FY 2019 enacted level and $6.2 million below the President’s budget request, including:

  • $223.8 million, as requested, for phase 2 construction of a new headquarters for the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) on the St. Elizabeths campus.

Office of Inspector General – The bill provides $190.2 million for the Office of Inspector General, an increase of $22.2 million above the FY 2019 enacted level and an increase of $20 million above the budget request for increased oversight of detention and immigration enforcement activities.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) – The bill provides $14.9 billion for CBP, $43.7 million below the FY 2019 enacted level and $3.3 billion below the President’s budget request, including:

  • $104 million for 800 new positions in the Office of Field Operations, including 610 additional Officers and Agriculture Specialists;
     
    • When combined with fee funding, this will allow CBP to hire up to 1,200 new CBP Officers and 240 new Agriculture Specialists during FY 2020;
       
  • $16 million for opioid equipment and staffing at international mail and express consignment facilities;
     
  • $222 million for new border security and trade and travel technology;
     
  • $198 million for additional air and marine assets, to include three multi-enforcement aircraft, one above the request;
     
  • $3.96 billion for Border Security Operations, $73.7 million above the FY2019 enacted level and $110.3 million below the President’s budget request, including $203 million in emergency funding as follows:
     
    • $173 million for humanitarian care of individuals in CBP custody; and
       
    • $30 million for critical life and safety repairs and maintenance at existing Border Patrol Facilities and for improvements to closed caption video systems;
       
  • $30 million for a DHS-wide electronic health records capability; and
     
  • $1.375 billion for fencing along the southwest border, $3.625 billion below the request.

Provides no funding for an increased number of border patrol agents.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) – Provides $8.08 billion for ICE, $492.4 million above the FY 2019 enacted level and $701.1 million below the President’s budget request, including:

  • $2.04 billion for investigations with cross-border nexus, including those related to human trafficking, financial crimes and cyber investigations, including:
     
    • $4 million increase for the Human Exploitation Rescue Operative Child-Rescue Corps; and
       
  • $4.4 billion for Enforcement and Removal Operations, $155.2 million above the FY2019 enacted level and $765 million below the President’s budget request, including:
     
    • $3.14 billion for Custody Operations, $28.3 million below the FY2019 enacted level and $549.1 million below the President’s budget request; and
       
    • $319 million for Alternatives to Detention, $44.6 million above the FY2019 enacted level, including $15 million for family case management and $4 million for an independent review of the program.

Rejects the proposed use of USCIS Immigration Examination Fee funding to support ICE investigations.

Provides no funding for additional immigration enforcement personnel.

Provides funding for detention capacity equivalent to the average daily population in detention funded in the FY 2019 enacted bill.

Provides additional funding to address the backlog of critical maintenance and repairs at existing, ICE-owned detention facilities.

Transportation Security Administration (TSA) – Provides $4.9 billion for TSA, $53.1 million above the FY2019 enacted level and $1.1 billion above the President’s budget request, including.

Rejects the proposed increase to the airline passenger fee. 

Fully funds the Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response teams (VIPR); staffing at exit lanes; and the Law Enforcement Officer reimbursement program.

Coast Guard – Provides $12 billion for the Coast Guard, $49.8 million below the FY2019 enacted level and $846.7 million above the President’s budget request, including:

  • $1.77 billion for significant new investments in the Coast Guard’s air and marine fleet, and facilities, including continued support for the Polar Security Cutter, Fast Response Cutters, MH-60 helicopters, and C-130 J aircraft.

Continues FY 2019 investments for additional military personnel and a child care subsidy and includes new investments in workforce readiness and recruiting.

United States Secret Service (USSS) – Provides $2.4 billion for the USSS, $167.7 million above the FY2019 enacted level and $106.9 million above the President’s budget request, including:

  • $6 million for grants related to investigations of missing and exploited children; and
     
  • $30 million for basic and advanced computer forensics training for state and local law enforcement officers, judges, and prosecutors.

Provides funding for 7,777 US Secret Service personnel, the highest level in decades.

Fully funds security requirements to support the 2020 election campaign.

Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) – Provides $2 billion for CISA, $333.9 million above the FY 2019 enacted level and $407.5 million above the President budget request.

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) – Provides $22.3 billion for FEMA, $5.7 billion above the FY 2019 enacted level and $4 billion above the President’s budget request, including:

  • $17.8 billion for disaster response and recovery efforts; and
     
  • $2.9 billion for state and local grants, including:
     
    • $560 million for the State Homeland Security Grant Program (SHSGP);
    • $665 million for the Urban Areas Security Initiative (UASI);
    • $90 million for non-profit security grants within the totals for SHSGP and UASI;
    • $710 million for firefighter grant programs;
    • $125 million for the Emergency Food and Shelter program; and
    • $10 million, transferred from the Office of the Secretary, for Targeted Violence and Terrorism Prevention Grants.

Other 

  • $10 million for the Citizenship and Integration Grant program.
  • $351.2 million for the Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers, $22.4 million above the FY2019 enacted level and $235,000 above the President’s budget request.
  • $737.3 million for the Science and Technology Directorate, $82.5 million below the FY2019 enacted level and $155.2 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $432.3 million for the Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office, $2.6 million below the FY2019 enacted level and $9.1 million above the request.

Policy Provisions –

  • Authorizes the establishment of an Immigration Detention Ombudsman, reporting directly to the Secretary, with responsibility for receiving, investigating, and resolving complaints regarding misconduct by DHS personnel and violations of the rights of individuals in DHS custody, including through unannounced inspections of detention facilities.
  • Requires DHS to provide data related to its credible and reasonable fear interview process, including data on the results of a pilot to use Border Patrol Agents to conduct such interviews and the impact of a policy restricting eligibility for asylum for migrants who transited through a third country en route to the United States.
  • Continues and amends language allowing only fencing designs in use as of 2017, but allows adapted designs that mitigate community and environmental impacts after required consultation with jurisdictions through which fencing is planned.
  • Prohibits the use of any federal funding to construct fencing in Bentsen-Rio State Park, the National Butterfly Center, the Santa Ana Wildlife Refuge, the Lower Rio Grande Wildlife Refuge between Brownsville, TX, and the Gulf of Mexico, and historic cemeteries. 
  • Withholds $5 million from CBP headquarters until CBP provides information related to short-term holding of migrants, the Migrant Protection Protocols program, and medical guidance. 
  • Requires ICE to make information publicly available about the numbers and categories of people in ICE custody.
  • Requires ICE to make information about the 287(g) program publicly available.
  • Requires ICE to sever contracts with detention facilities that fail two consecutive inspections and requires more frequent inspections by ICE’s Office of Professional Responsibility.
  • Authorizes members of Congress to conduct unannounced inspections of detention facilities.
  • Prohibits DHS from destroying records related to potential sexual assault or abuse of individuals in its custody.
  • Continues to ensure that information shared with ICE by the Department of Health and Human on potential sponsors of unaccompanied children cannot be used by ICE for detention or removal purposes unless the sponsor has a dangerous criminal background.
  • Continues to prevent DHS from placing pregnant women in restraints except in extraordinary circumstances.
116th Congress