House to Consider Six-Bill Appropriations Minibus This Week

July 28, 2020
Press Release

NOTE: This release and summary were updated on July 28 to reflect changes made in Chairwoman Lowey’s Manager’s Amendment to H.R. 7617.

WASHINGTON — In advance of Floor consideration this week, the House Appropriations Committee released a division-by-division summary of the second minibus of fiscal year 2021 appropriations bills. The House is expected to consider the legislation, H.R. 7617, beginning this week.

The package includes six FY 2021 spending bills: Defense, Commerce-Justice-Science, Energy and Water Development, Financial Services and General Government, Labor-HHS-Education, and Transportation-Housing and Urban Development.

A division-by-division summary is below and available as a PDF here.


H.R. 7617
DIVISION-BY-DIVISION SUMMARY

H.R. 7617 totals $1.3 trillion in discretionary funding and consists of six FY 2021 appropriations bills: Defense, Commerce-Justice-Science, Energy and Water Development, Financial Services and General Government, Labor-HHS-Education, and Transportation-Housing and Urban Development. Chairwoman Lowey’s Manager’s Amendment would also add a new division to require the removal of certain offensive statues and busts from the United States Capitol.

In total, the package provides:

  • $658.8 billion in base defense funding;
  • $372 billion in base nondefense funding;
  • $68.4 billion for defense Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO);
  • $1.9 billion for nondefense program integrity initiatives;
  • $210 billion in emergency supplemental appropriations; and
  • $143 million for nondefense disaster relief activities.


Table of Contents

Defense
Commerce-Justice-Science
Energy and Water Development
Financial Services and General Government
Labor-HHS-Education
Transportation-Housing and Urban Development

Division A – Defense

Overview:

The Defense bill funds the Department of Defense, including operations and maintenance, readiness activities, research and development, equipment modernization, and health and quality-of-life programs for our troops and military families.

For fiscal year 2021, the bill provides $694.6 billion in new discretionary spending authority for the Department of Defense for functions under the Defense Subcommittee’s jurisdiction, an increase of $1.3 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level, and $3.7 billion below the President’s budget request. This includes $626.2 billion in base funding, an increase of $3.5 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level, and $3.5 billion below the President’s request. It also includes $68.4 billion for OCO/GWOT funding in title IX, a decrease of $2.2 billion below the FY 2020 enacted level, and $200 million below the President’s request.

Bill Summary:

Military Personnel

Total:                                      $162.3 billion

Base:                                       $157.7 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):           $4.6 billion

The FY 2021 Military Personnel recommendation is $157.7 billion in base funding for active, reserve and National Guard military personnel, a decrease of $1.2 billion below the budget request and an increase of $7.5 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level.

  • Funds active duty end strength of 1,351,500, an increase of 12,000 above current year and equal to the request. Funds reserve component end strength of 802,000, an increase of 1,200 above current year and equal to the request. 
    • Army totals:  485,900 active duty, an increase of 5,900 above current year and equal to the request; 189,800 reserve, an increase of 300 above current year and equal to the request; and 336,500 Guard, an increase of 500 above current year and equal to the request.
    • Navy totals:  347,800 active duty, an increase of 7,300 above current year and equal to the request; and 58,800 reserve, a decrease of 200 below current year and equal to the request.
    • Marine Corps totals:   184,100 active duty, a decrease of 2,100 below current year and equal to the request; and 38,500 reserve, equal to current year and the request.
    • Air Force totals:  333,700 active duty, an increase of 900 above current year and equal to the request; 70,300 reserve, an increase of 200 above current year and equal to the request; and 108,100 Guard, an increase of 400 above current year and equal to the request.
  • Provides full funding necessary to support the proposed 3.0 percent military pay raise.
  • Increases funding by $45 million above the President’s request for the Department and Services’ Sexual Assault Prevention and Response programs, for a total of $323 million. This includes $40 million for the Special Victims’ Counsel and an increase of $5 million above the request for the Department’s Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office. In addition, provides $4 million for the Sexual Trauma Pilot Program.

Operation and Maintenance

Total:                                      $254.5 billion

Base:                                      $196.7 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):          $57.8 billion

The FY 2021 Operation and Maintenance recommendation is $196.7 billion in base funding, an increase of $72.5 million above the budget request and a decrease of $2.7 billion below the FY 2020 enacted level.

  • Provides $1.67 billion above the request for key readiness programs to prepare forces for combat operations and other peacetime missions: flying hours, tank miles, and steaming days; equipment, aviation, and ship depot maintenance; training; spare parts; and base operations.
  • Provides $24.7 billion to the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force for depot maintenance.
  • Provides $9.5 billion to fund SOCOM’s operation and maintenance requirements.
  • Provides $22 million to the Special Operations Command to restore flight operations for the 137th Special Operations Wing.
  • Provides $80.3 million to the Special Operations Command to fund equipment lost or destroyed in combat.
  • Provides $1.486 billion for Environmental Restoration activities, $413 million above the request, and $70.8 million above the fiscal year 2020 enacted level. In addition, provides $15 million for study and assessment of health implications of PFOS/PFOA contamination in drinking water.
  • Provides $270 million above the request to address public school infrastructure requirements on DoD installations.
  • Provides an additional $116 million for upgrades to childcare facilities and report language directing the services to present innovative ideas to assist Servicemembers with this quality of life issue.
  • Provides $2.49 billion to continue the transition of space activities to the Space Force. 
  • Provides increases for National Guard Youth Challenge ($210m); and Starbase (+$41.1 million).
  • Provides an additional $50 million for the Office of Economic Assistance for the Defense Community Infrastructure Program.
  • Provides $40 million for Impact Aid and $10 million for Impact Aid for those with disabilities.
  • Provides $6.75 million for gender advisor programs.
  • Provides $10 million for the Maternity Uniform Pilot Program.
  • Provides $48 million for the Procurement Technical Assistance Program.
  • Provides $360 million for the Cooperative Threat Reduction program. 
  • Provides $50 million for noise mitigation tools for communities.
  • Provides $1 million to the Army for the renaming of installations, facilities, roads and streets that bear the name of confederate leaders and officers.
  •  Provides $450 million for COVID resupply and recovery.

Procurement

Total:                                      $140.1 billion

Base:                                       $133.6 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):           $6.5 billion

The FY 2021 Procurement recommendation is $133.6 billion in base funding, an increase of $2.8 billion above the budget request and a decrease of $0.2 billion below the FY 2020 enacted level.                                              

  • Provides $4.1 billion above the total funding request (including OCO/GWOT) for increased investments in ground vehicles, aircraft, ships, munitions, and other equipment.

Aircraft

  • Funds the request of 24 F/A-18E/F Super Hornet aircraft ($1.7 billion).
  • Funds 91 F-35 aircraft, 12 more than the request ($9.3 billion).
  • Funds 12 F-15EX aircraft to recapitalize the F-15C/D fleet ($1.2 billion).
  • Funds the request of 15 KC-46 tankers ($2.7 billion).
  • Funds the request of 19 HH-60W combat rescue helicopters ($1.1 billion).
  • Funds 11 C/KC/MC-130J aircraft, 2 more than the request ($965 million).
  • Funds 16 MQ-9 Reaper air vehicles, 16 more than the request ($344 million).
  • Funds the first five CH-47F Block II Chinook aircraft and long-lead funding for the second five CH-47F Block II Chinook aircraft to ensure that the Army stays on schedule with the program of record ($227 million).
  • Provides $141 million above the request to fund a total of 42 UH/HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters ($866 million).
  • Funds the requested 50 remanufactured AH-64 Apache helicopters ($792 million).
  • Funds eleven V-22 aircraft, two more than the request ($1.1 billion).
  • Funds three P-8A Poseidon aircraft for the Navy Reserve, three more than the request ($510 million).
  • Funds five E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft, one more than the request ($791 million).
  • Funds nine CH-53K helicopters, two more than the request ($1.05 billion).
  • Funds a new start for SOCOM’s Armed Overwatch Program.

Shipbuilding

  • Provides $22.3 billion to procure nine Navy ships, $2.4 billion above the request.
  • Funds are provided for two DDG-51 guided missile destroyers, the initial Columbia Class submarine, two SSN-774 attack submarines, one Frigate, one LPD-17 Flight II, and two towing, salvage, and rescue ships.

Vehicles/Force Protection

  • Provides $375 million above the request to upgrade a total of 259 Stryker combat vehicles ($1.16 billion).
  • Funds the request to upgrade 89 Abrams tanks to the M1A2 SEPv3 tank variant ($1.02 billion).
  • Provides an additional $100 million for Army National Guard HMMWV modernization.
  • Fully funds the Army’s request for 1,920 Joint Light Tactical Vehicles (JLTVs) and 1,334 JLTV companion trailers.

Other

  • Provides $933 million to procure three National Security Space Launch services.
  • Provides $623 million to procure two GPS IIIF spacecraft.
  • Provides $200 million to fully support Israeli Cooperative procurement programs (Iron Dome, David’s Sling, and Arrow).
  • Includes $1 billion for the National Guard and Reserve Equipment Account (NGREA).
  • Provides $758 million to mitigate the impacts of COVID on second, third, and fourth tier suppliers in the Defense Industrial Base.

Research, Development, Test and Evaluation

Total:                                      $104.6 billion

Base:                                      $104.3 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):           $0.3 billion

The FY 2021 RDT&E recommendation is $104.3 billion in base funding, a decrease of $1.9 billion below the budget request and a decrease of $0.1 billion below the FY 2020 enacted level.

  • Invests in basic and applied scientific research, development, test and evaluation of new technologies and equipment, and supports the research community so forces will have the systems and equipment for tomorrow’s challenges.

Aircraft

  • Fully funds the Block 4 follow-on development of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter ($1.6 billion).
  • Fully funds the continued development of the Air Force’s B-21 bomber program ($2.8 billion).
  • Fully funds development of the VC-25B Presidential Aircraft Replacement ($801 million).
  • Provides $20 million above the request for the development of the Army’s Future Long Range Assault Aircraft ($154 million).
  • Fully funds the design, build, and test of prototypes for the Army’s Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft ($513 million).
  • Fully funds the continued development and testing of the CH-53K helicopter ($407 million).

Vehicles and Ground Forces

  • Provides $10 million above the request to fund the Army’s Long Range Hypersonic Weapon ($811 million).
  • Fully funds the Army’s Extended Range Cannon Artillery (ERCA) modernization effort ($421 million).

Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA)

  • Provides $3.51 billion for DARPA research programs.

Other

  • Provides $300 million for the Israeli cooperative research and development programs, including David’s Sling and Arrow-3.
  • Provides $258 million for the Global Positioning System IIIF program.
  • Provides $482 million for the Global Positioning System III Operational Control Segment.
  • Provides $380 million for Global Positioning System user equipment.
  • Provides $561 million for National Security Space Launch to develop new U.S. space launch vehicles.
  • Provides $2.32 billion for Next Generation Overhead Persistent Infrared.

Revolving and Management Funds

Total:                                      $1.37 billion

Base Requirements:            $1.35 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):          $0.02 billion

The FY 2021 Revolving and Management Funds recommendation is $1.35 billion in base funding, equal to the budget request and a decrease of $210 million below the FY 2020 enacted level.

  • Fully funds the Defense Working Capital Fund request for War Reserve material and commissary operations.
  • Fully funds the Defense Commissary Agency to ensure servicemembers and their families receive continued savings for food and household goods as part of the military pay and benefits package.

Other Department of Defense Programs

Total:                                      $35.7 billion

Base Requirements:            $35.3 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):          $0.4 billion

Defense Health Programs

  • $33.3 billion plus $365.1 million for OCO/GWOT Requirements.

Adds $512.5 million for cancer research.  The total amount is distributed as follows:

  • $150 million for the breast cancer research program;
  • $110 million for the prostate cancer research program;
  • $50 million for the kidney cancer research program;
  • $35 million for the ovarian cancer research program;
  • $20 million for the lung cancer research program;
  • $20 million for the melanoma research program;
  • $10 million for the pancreatic cancer research program;
  • $7.5 million for the rare cancer research program; and
  • $110 million for the cancer research program.
  • Adds $175 million for the peer reviewed psychological health and traumatic brain injury research program.
  • Adds $40 million for spinal cord research.
  • Adds $40 million for the joint warfighter medical research program.
  •  Adds $150 million for COVID Resupply and Recovery

Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction

  • $889.5 million, as requested.

Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid

  • $147.5 million, including for foreign disaster relief, humanitarian assistance, and the humanitarian mine action program at levels above the budget request.

Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities

  • $746 million, including $70 million above the budget request for the National Guard Counter-Drug Program.
  • Does not continue funding for programs the Administration reduced during FY 2020 for the border wall.
  • Does not fund an additional $20 million requested in FY 2021 for the border wall.

Office of the Inspector General

  • $387.7 million, an increase of $16.3 million above the request for oversight of funding provided in CARES.
  • Includes $24.1 million for OCO/GWOT Requirements, as requested.

General Provisions

  • Includes $2.5 billion in prior year rescissions plus $1.5 billion in rescissions from prior year OCO/GWOT funding.
  • Includes $270 million for public schools on military installations.
  • Does not include prior year provisions related to detainees at the military prison located in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
  • Prohibits funds for the Taliban except support for reconciliation activities that also include the Afghan government, do not restrict the participation of women, and are authorized by law.
  • Prohibits funds to establish permanent bases in Afghanistan or Iraq.
  • Prohibits funds from being used in contravention of the War Powers Resolution.
  • Requires the Secretary of Defense to notify Congress of any foreign contribution received relating to the stationing or operations of U.S. troops. 
  • Requires the Secretary of Defense to notify Congress of the opening or closing of foreign bases.
  • Provides $250 million for the ISR transfer fund to address near-term gaps in existing ISR capabilities.
  • Prohibits funds in the Act for any use of military force in or against Iran, with certain exceptions.  This is consistent with H.R. 550, which passed the full House in January.  Also provides that nothing in this Act may be construed as authorizing the use of force against Iran. 
  • Repeals the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force 240 days after the date of the enactment of this Act and the Repeals the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002. 

Afghanistan Security Forces Fund

  • $3.05 billion. Funds may only be obligated if the Secretary of Defense certifies that the Afghanistan Security Forces are controlled by a civilian, representative government that is protecting human rights and women’s rights and preventing terrorists from using the territory of Afghanistan to threaten the security of the United States and U.S. allies.
  • Provides not less than $20 million for the recruitment and retention of women, which is twice the amount specified last year.
  • Prevents payments to so-called “ghost soldiers” by prohibiting funds for Afghanistan security personnel who are not enrolled in the Afghanistan Personnel and Pay System.   
  • Directs quarterly reports to Congress on United States and coalition personnel in Afghanistan and the current conditions of the conflict, including metrics related to the peace agreement and an assessment of whether the Taliban is adhering to its commitments. 

Counter-ISIS Train and Equip Fund

  • $700 million, including support for the Iraqi Security Forces, Kurdish Peshmerga, and the Syrian Democratic Forces fighting ISIS. 
  • Requires the Secretary of Defense to ensure that elements are appropriately vetted and have made commitments to promote respect for human rights and the rule of law.
  • Prohibits funds to exercise United States control over any oil resource of Iraq or Syria.

Security Cooperation Programs

  • $1.14 billion for International Security Cooperation Programs.
    • $160 million for programs with countries in the Africa Command area of responsibility, $63 million above the request.  
    • $130 million for programs with countries in the Southern Command area of responsibility, $61 million above the request. 
    • $105 million for programs with Jordan. 
    • $150 million for the Baltic Security Initiative.
    • $3 million above the request for women’s programs. $3.75 million is also included in the bill for the training of U.S. personnel related to these programs.
  • $275 million for the Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative, $25 million above the request.  Exempts funds from apportionment and requires the Secretary of Defense to inform Congress of any undue spending delays.

Congressional Oversight

  • Prohibits the use of Defense funds for the President’s border wall at our troops’ expense. Also requires that any unobligated funds that were taken for the border wall in fiscal year 2020 be returned to their original accounts and used for the original purposes for which they were appropriated by Congress.
  • Responds to the Department of Defense’s abuse of congressionally granted reprogramming privileges by reducing transfer authority from the $9.5 billion requested to $1.9 billion and placing additional oversight mechanisms on the Department’s ability to reprogram funds.
  • Prohibits unnecessary nuclear weapons testing.
  • Prohibits the transfer of F-35 fighters to Turkey to prevent the exposure of cutting-edge U.S. technology to Russian missile systems.
  • Limits the deployment of active armed forces to the southern border unless costs are reimbursed by the requesting Department or agency.
  • Conforms with the language included in Section 365 of H.R. 7120 regarding the transfer of any personal property of the Department of Defense to a state or local law enforcement agency.
  • Provides $1 million to the Army for the renaming of installations, facilities, roads and streets that bear the name of confederate leaders and officers since the Army has the preponderance of the entities to change. 

Division B – Commerce-Justice-Science

Overview:

The Commerce-Justice-Science bill funds the Departments of Commerce and Justice, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and other related agencies.

The legislation contains $71.473 billion in discretionary budget authority, a reduction of $1.7 billion below the FY 2020 enacted level, reflecting the completion of the 2020 Decennial Census.

The bill provides strong funding increases to help ensure civil rights and reform police practices throughout the country.  The bill also provides funding increases to help create jobs, fix the country’s infrastructure, support U.S. manufacturing, research and prepare for climate change, reduce gun violence, address the opioid crisis, and help keep schools safe. Furthermore, the bill provides funding increases for science research, science education, and legal services for underserved communities.

Bill Summary:

Department of Commerce – The bill includes $9.54 billion for the Commerce Department, a decrease of $5.68 billion below the FY 2020 enacted level and $1.2 billion above the President’s budget request. This includes funding for the following agencies.

  • Census Bureau – The bill provides $1.68 billion for the Census Bureau, reflecting the operational rampdown of the 2020 Decennial Census and restoring funding to the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), which measures the effectiveness and use of Federal, state, and local programs.
     
  • Economic Development Administration (EDA) – The legislation includes $356 million for the EDA, an increase of $23 million above the FY 2020 level. These funds will help improve our nation’s infrastructure, boost economically recovering communities, and launch innovative community development efforts.
     
  • Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA):  The legislation includes $52 million for MBDA, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to help create jobs and expand business growth opportunities among minority-owned U.S. companies.
     
  • National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) – NIST is funded at $1.04 billion in the bill, including $153 million for the Manufacturing Extension Partnership program, an increase of $7 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. $789 million is also included for core NIST research activities, an increase of $35 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to help advance U.S. competitiveness, economic growth, cybersecurity and other important efforts.
     
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – The legislation contains $5.45 billion for NOAA, which is $101.9 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $829.2 million above the request. Funding will help address important priorities such as climate research, improvements in weather forecasting, the reduction of harmful algal blooms, fisheries management, and STEM education.

Department of Justice (DOJ) – The bill funds DOJ at $33.2 billion, an increase of $972.5 million above the FY 2020 discretionary enacted level. These investments will strengthen protection for civil rights while sustaining Federal law enforcement efforts to thwart violent crime, fight human traffickers, and bring serious criminals to justice.  This includes funding for the following:

  • Policing Reform and Racial Justice – Takes concrete actions and provides resources for meaningful change, including:
    • $400 million for grants to carry out police reform initiatives, including:
      • $100 million for pattern and practice investigations
      • $250 million to implement statutes providing for independent investigation of law enforcement
      • $25 million for community-based organizations aimed at improving law enforcement
      • $25 million for pilot programs and the implementation of effective standards and programs aimed at improving management and addressing misconduct by law enforcement officers
    • $77.5 million for Police-Community Relations Grant programs
    • $50 million within Byrne JAG for training for state and local law enforcement on racial profiling, implicit bias, de-escalation, use of force, the duty to intervene when witnessing another officer using excessive force, and procedural justice
    • Directs the Attorney General to establish a training program for Federal law enforcement officers on the use of force, de-escalation, racial profiling, implicit bias, and procedural justice, including training on the duty of Federal law enforcement officers to intervene in cases where another law enforcement officer is using excessive force against a civilian
    • $27.2 million within Byrne JAG to help state and local law enforcement improve reporting on the use of force, comply with consent decrees and other reform measures, and create local task forces on public safety innovation
    • $25 million for Federal investigation and prosecution support to address misconduct and systemic change in police organizations, and negates limits on such efforts begun by former Attorney General Sessions
    • $8 million for Hate Crime Prevention and Prosecution Grants
    • $5 million for a new National Task Force on Law Enforcement Oversight
    • $4 million for Civilian Review Boards
    • Requires state and local law enforcement agencies to begin or complete the process of obtaining accreditation from a certified law enforcement accreditation organization, as a precondition for receiving any fiscal year 2021 Justice Department funds.
    • Requires state and local governments, as a precondition for receiving any fiscal year 2021 COPS or Byrne JAG funds, to comply with nine conditions aimed at improving police practices; eliminating racial profiling and implicit bias; eliminating excessive force and chokeholds; eliminating “no-knock” warrants in drug cases; eliminating contractual arrangements that prevent investigations of law enforcement misconduct; and eliminating sexual contact between police and persons in their custody.
    • Requires at least 25 percent of a recipient’s Byrne JAG formula funds to be spent in specified ways aimed at improving police practices.
  • Other Justice Grant Programs – The bill additionally includes further responsible and effective investments in state and local justice, including:
    • $525 million for Violence Against Women Act programs
    • $251.5 million for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program
    • $142 million for DNA Initiative Grants
    • $49 million for Grants to Reduce the Sexual Assault Kit Backlog
    • $140 million for STOP School Violence Act programs
    • $95 million for Victims of Trafficking grants
    • $100 million for Second Chance Act programs
    • $94.5 million for Missing and Exploited Children programs
  • Anti-Opioid Abuse – $412 million for grant programs authorized under the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act, an increase of $34 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to help stem this abuse, including for drug courts, treatment, prescription drug monitoring, and overdose-reversal drugs.  The bill maintains Federal law enforcement resources to investigate and prosecute drug traffickers.
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) – $9.7 billion for salaries and expenses, an increase of $235.4 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. The bill maintains critical FBI missions, including funding to continue to address cybercrime and cyberthreats, foreign intelligence, human trafficking, and NICS gun background checks.  It also funds enhanced civil rights enforcement.
     
  • Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) – $730 million is provided, an increase of $61 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. This increase will allow for the continued hiring of immigration judges and support staff to address the immigration case backlog.
     
  • Community Relations Service (CRS) – $20.3 million for CRS, an increase of $4.3 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.
     
  • Bureau of Prisons (BOP) – $7.7 billion for salaries and expenses, an increase of $300 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  This includes not less than $165 million to continue progress in implementing the First Step Act, an increase of $90 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.
     
  • Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) – The legislation contains $1.55 billion for ATF, an increase of $150 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. This funding will provide additional resources, including for expansion of the National Integrated Ballistic Information Network (NIBIN), to reduce violent gun crime.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) – $22.63 billion, equal to the FY 2020 enacted level. This funding includes continued investments in human space exploration efforts, as well as other investments, including the following:

  • $819 million for Aeronautics research, an increase of $35 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request, to continue efforts to improve passenger safety, fuel efficiency, and noise reduction, and to make air travel more environmentally sustainable.
  • $126 million for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Engagement, an increase of $6 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to inspire young people to pursue future careers in science and engineering, and rejecting the Administration’s request to eliminate funding for these programs.
     
  • National Science Foundation (NSF) –$8.55 billion, an increase of $270 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $806.9 million above the request.  These funds will foster innovation and U.S. economic competitiveness, including funding for research on artificial intelligence, quantum information science, advanced manufacturing, physics, mathematics, cybersecurity, neuroscience, and STEM education.   The bill also invests in important scientific infrastructure such as modernization of Antarctica facilities, as well as telescopes and research vessels.   Within this total:
    • Research and Related Activities are funded at $6.97 billion, an increase of $229.9 million above the FY 2020 enacted level; and
    • Education and Human Resources are funded at $970 million, an increase of $30 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) – $408.7 million, an increase of $19.2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $46.2 million above the Administration’s request.

Legal Services Corporation:  The legislation provides $465 million for the Legal Services Corporation, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to help increase the availability of legal assistance in underserved communities.

Policy Provisions –

  • Eliminates section 201 of the Administration’s request, a longstanding provision that would have allowed up to $50,000 for additional Attorney General reception and representation expenses.
  • Eliminates section 205 of the Administration’s request, a longstanding provision that would have allowed up to 5 percent of any appropriation to the Justice Department to be transferred between appropriations, with limits. 
  • Adds new restriction prohibiting funds in this Act from supporting Attorney General travel outside the National Capital Region.
  • Adds new language prohibiting funding for law enforcement for crowd control, unless such law enforcement wears clearly visible identification showing their agency affiliation.
  • Prohibits funding for more than five political appointees at the Census Bureau.

Division C – Energy and Water Development

Overview:

The Energy and Water Development bill funds the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Interior programs, the Department of Energy, and other related agencies.

For fiscal year 2021, the legislation invests $49.6 billion in Energy and Water Development programs, an increase of $1.26 billion, or 3 percent, above the fiscal year 2020 enacted level. This funding will spur energy innovation that will create jobs and reinvigorate the economy while working to mitigate and adapt to climate change, improve the nation’s water infrastructure, and strengthen national security. The bill includes $23.1 billion for non-defense activities, $987 million below the fiscal year 2020 enacted level, and $26.5 billion for defense spending, an increase of $2.25 billion above the fiscal year 2020 enacted level.

To respond to the coronavirus pandemic and the ensuing economic recession, the bill provides an additional $43.5 billion in emergency spending. This funding builds and repairs water infrastructure projects and modernizes energy infrastructure for a clean energy future.

Bill Summary:

Army Corps of Engineers – For fiscal year 2021, the bill provides a total of $7.63 billion, an increase of $1.7 billion above the President’s budget request.

  • Investigations – The bill provides $151 million, equal to the FY 2020 enacted level and $48 million above the request.
     
  • Construction – The bill provides $2.6 billion, $447 million above the request.
     
  • Operation and Maintenance – The bill provides $3.84 billion, an increase of $48 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $1.8 billion above the request.
     
  • Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund projects receive $1.68 billion, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $665 million above the request. This meets the target set by authorizers for FY 2021 and represents 92 percent of estimated revenues compared to the FY 2021 target of 83 percent.
     
  • The bill provides for seven new study starts and seven new construction projects.

In addition, to support the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, the bill provides an additional $17 billion in emergency funding to accelerate work on Corps projects around the country, putting Americans back to work and improving water infrastructure while reducing the current backlog. This includes:

  • Investigations – The bill provides $110 million for feasibility studies.
     
  • Construction – The bill provides $10 billion to accelerate projects that provide protection from floods, ensure navigable channels to move goods, and restore the environment.
     
  • Operation and Maintenance – The bill provides $5 billion to address unmet operations and maintenance needs and repair damaged Corps projects across the country.

Department of the Interior and Bureau of Reclamation – For fiscal year 2021, the bill provides a total of $1.66 billion for the Department, an increase of $518 million above the President’s budget request.

  • Central Utah Project – The bill provides $20 million, the same as the FY 2020 level and an increase of $10 million above the request.
     
  • Bureau of Reclamation – The bill provides $1.64 billion, an increase of $508 million above the request. Within Reclamation:
    • The bill provides $502 million in additional funding for water resources projects, including those authorized in the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation (WIIN) Act.
    • Within additional funding, $100 million above the request is provided for rural water projects.   

In addition, to support the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, the bill provides an additional $3 billion in emergency funding to accelerate work on Department of the Interior and Bureau of Reclamation projects, putting Americans back to work and improving water infrastructure.

Department of Energy – For fiscal year 2021, the bill provides a total of $41 billion for the Department, an increase of $2.3 billion above the FY 2020 level and $5.1 billion above the President’s budget request.

  • Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy – The bill provides $2.85 billion, an increase of $58 million above the FY 2020 level and $2.1 billion above the request. This funding provides for clean, affordable, and secure energy and ensures American leadership in the transition to a global clean energy economy. 
        
  • Cybersecurity, Energy Security, and Emergency Response – The bill provides $160 million, an increase of $4 million above the FY 2020 level. This funding provides for efforts to secure the nation’s energy infrastructure against all hazards, reduce the risks of and impacts from cybersecurity events, and assist with restoration activities.
     
  • Electricity – The bill provides $195 million, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2020 level. This funding will advance technologies to increase the resiliency and efficiency of the nation’s electricity delivery system with capabilities to incorporate growing amounts of clean energy technologies.
     
  • Nuclear Energy – The bill provides $1.4 billion, an increase of $256 million above the request. The funding invests in research, development, and demonstration activities that develop the next generation of clean and safe reactors, further improve the safety and economic viability of our current reactor fleet, and contribute to the nation’s long-term leadership in the global nuclear power industry. 
     
  • Fossil Energy Research and Development – The bill provides $728 million. This funding provides for research, development, and demonstration activities to ensure the safe, efficient, and environmentally sound use of fossil energy resources.
     
  • Science – The bill provides $7.05 billion, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2020 level and $1.2 billion above the request. The Office of Science funds basic science research in physics, biology, chemistry, and other science disciplines to expand scientific understanding and secure the nation’s global leadership in energy innovation.
     
  • Nuclear Waste Disposal – The bill provides $27.5 million for interim storage of nuclear waste and oversight of the Nuclear Waste Fund.
     
  • Advanced Research Projects Agency—Energy – The bill provides $435 million, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 level and rejects the President’s proposal to eliminate the program. This funding supports research aimed at rapidly developing energy technologies that are capable of significantly changing the energy sector to address the nation’s critical economic, environmental, and energy security challenges.
     
  • Indian Energy Policy and Programs – The bill provides $22 million, an increase of $14 million above the request. This funding will provide technical assistance, direct and remote education, policy research and analysis, and financial assistance to Indian tribes, Alaska Native Village and Regional corporations, and Tribal Energy Resource Development Organizations.
     
  • National Nuclear Security Administration – The bill provides $18 billion for DOE’s nuclear security programs, an increase of $1.3 billion above the FY 2020 level. This funding will maintain a safe, secure, and credible nuclear deterrent while addressing the threat of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. This includes:
    • Weapons Activities – $13.7 billion, an increase of $1.2 billion above the FY 2020 level to maintain a safe and reliable nuclear deterrent.
    • Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation – $2.24 billion, an increase of $75 million above the FY 2020 level and $209 million above the request. This funding secures nuclear material at home and abroad, combats the threat of nuclear terrorism, and provides emergency response capabilities.
    • Naval Reactors – $1.7 billion, an increase of $35.6 million above the FY 2020 level, to continue safe and reliable operation of the Navy’s nuclear-powered fleet.
       
  • Environmental Management – The bill provides $7.46 billion, an increase of $1.4 billion above the request. This funding is used for nuclear cleanup work at 16 sites across the country. This includes: 
    • Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup – $315 million, an increase of $39 million above the request.
    • Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning – $821.6 million, an increase of $15 million above the request.
    • Defense Environmental Cleanup – $6.3 billion, an increase of $66 million above the FY 2020 level and $1.3 billion above the request.
       
  • Loan Guarantee Programs – The bill rejects the President’s proposal to eliminate these programs and includes funding consistent with the FY 2020 levels.
     
  • Power Marketing Administrations – The bill provides the net budget request levels for the Southeastern Power Administration, Southwestern Power Administration, and Western Area Power Administration. The bill rejects the President’s proposal to sell the transmission assets of the PMAs, change the laws governing how the PMAs establish power rates, and repeal the borrowing authority for the Western Area Power Administration.

In addition, to support the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, the bill provides an additional $23.5 billion in emergency funding for the Department of Energy to modernize energy infrastructure for a clean energy future.

  • Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy – The bill provides $7.78 billion to deploy energy efficient and clean energy infrastructure throughout the country and ensure that low-income households across the country have energy-efficient, more livable homes.
  • Electricity – The bill provides $3.35 billion to enhance the resilience, reliability, and security of electric grid infrastructure.
  • Nuclear Energy – The bill provides $1.25 billion to build advanced nuclear reactor demonstrations and improve infrastructure at national laboratories.
  • Fossil Energy – The bill provides $1.25 billion to build demonstrations in negative emissions technologies and carbon capture, utilization, and storage technologies and improve infrastructure at national laboratories.
  • Science – The bill provides $6.25 billion for national laboratories, scientific user facilities, and universities to accelerate ongoing construction projects across the country.
  • Advanced Research Projects Agency—Energy – The bill provides $250 million for demonstrations of transformational energy technologies.
  • Environmental Management – The bill provides $3.13 billion to accelerate nuclear cleanup work at 16 sites across the country.

Independent Agencies

  • Nuclear Regulatory Commission – The bill provides a total net appropriation of $123 million, equal to the request. This funds regulatory activities to ensure the safe use of nuclear reactors and radioactive materials while protecting people and the environment.
     
  • Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board – The bill provides $31 million, an increase of $2.2 million above the request. The Board provides recommendations regarding public health and safety matters at Department of Energy defense nuclear facilities.
     
  • Appalachian Regional Commission – The bill provides $175 million, an increase of $10 million above the request. The Commission funds projects in the Appalachian Region to promote economic and community development, education and job training, and critical infrastructure.
     
  • Delta Regional Authority – The bill provides $15 million, an increase of $12.5 million above the request, and rejects the President’s proposal to eliminate the Authority. This funding targets the economic development needs of distressed portions of the Mississippi River Delta Region.
     
  • Denali Commission – The bill provides $15 million, an increase of $7.7 million above the request, and rejects the President’s proposal to eliminate the Commission. This funding provides critical utilities, infrastructure, health services, and economic support throughout Alaska.
     
  • Northern Border Regional Commission – The bill provides $25 million, an increase of $24.1 million above the request, and rejects the President’s proposal to eliminate the Commission. This funding targets the economic development needs of distressed portions of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York.
     
  • Southeast Crescent Regional Commission – The bill provides $1 million, an increase of $1 million above the request. This funding targets the economic development needs of distressed portions of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.
     
  • Southwest Border Regional Commission – The bill provides $250,000, an increase of $250,000 above the request. This funding targets the economic development needs of distressed portions of Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas.

Policy Provision

  • The bill prohibits funding for nuclear weapons testing.

Division D – Financial Services and General Government

Overview:

The Financial Services and General Government bill provides annual funding for the Department of the Treasury, the Judiciary, the Executive Office of the President, and other independent agencies, including the Small Business Administration. 

For fiscal year 2021, the bill includes $24.64 billion in discretionary funding, an increase of $808 million over the 2020 enacted level. In addition, to respond to the coronavirus pandemic and the ensuing economic recession, the bill provides $61 billion for broadband infrastructure and $6 billion for the modernization of Federal buildings.

The Financial Services and General Government bill supports a broad range of functions and services in both the Executive and Judicial branches that are essential to the operation of the Federal Government. In addition, the bill supports programs that assist and protect the public, such as shielding consumers from defective and dangerous products, assisting small businesses, investing in distressed communities, and ensuring the integrity of Federal elections. The bill includes significant funding increases to support these critical functions.

Bill Summary:

Department of the Treasury – For fiscal year 2021, the bill provides a total of $13.66 billion in discretionary appropriations for the Department, an increase of $601.4 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. The bill does not include the proposed transfer of the United States Secret Service from the Department of Homeland Security to the Department of the Treasury. Of the total provided for the Department of the Treasury, the bill includes:

  • $231.9 million for Departmental Offices Salaries and Expenses, an increase of $3.5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $9.6 million below the President’s budget request.
     
  • $172.8 million for the Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence, an increase of $3 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to continue investments to protect the integrity of the financial system.
     
  • $127 million for the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, an increase of $1 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to boost efforts to combat terrorist financing and money laundering.
     
  • $121.8 million for the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, an increase of $2.2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.
     
  • $273.5 million for Community Development Financial Institutions, an increase of $11.5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and a rejection of the proposal in the President’s budget to eliminate the program entirely. The total amount includes $10 million to increase the availability and affordability of small-dollar loans.
     
  • $231.4 million for Inspectors General offices for the Treasury Department, an increase of $3.2 million above the President’s budget request, to ensure robust oversight of Departmental policies and practices.
     
  • Internal Revenue Service (IRS) – The bill includes $12.1 billion for the IRS, an increase of $606.4 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. Of this amount, the bill includes:
     
    • $2.6 billion, an increase of $91 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for Taxpayer Services. This total includes growth for the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Matching Grants Program, Low Income Taxpayer Clinic, and the Taxpayer Advocate as well as continued support for Tax Counseling for the Elderly.   
       
    • $5.2 billion, an increase of $196 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for Enforcement.
       
    • $4.1 billion, an increase of $249 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for Operations Support.
       
    • $250 million, an increase of $70 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for Business Systems Modernization.

Executive Office of the President – The bill includes a total of $741.2 million, an increase of $14.2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $387.8 million above the President’s budget request.

  • Office of Management and Budget (OMB) The bill provides $107.2 million for OMB, an increase of $5.6 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $8.5 million below the President’s budget request.
  • Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) – The bill rejects the Administration’s proposed transfer or elimination of ONDCP grant programs and includes:
     
    • $290 million for the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas Program, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level; and
       
    • $102 million for the Drug-Free Communities Program, an increase of $750,000 above the FY 2020 enacted level.

The Judiciary – The bill includes a total of $7.8 billion in discretionary appropriations, an increase of $287 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. 

  • Courts of Appeals, District Courts, and Other Judicial Services – $5.4 billion, an increase of $163 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to support court operations and increased services in Probation and Pretrial.
     
  • Defender Services – $1.32 billion, an increase of $88 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to support operations and expenses associated with panel attorney compensation.
     
  • Court Security – $664 million, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to support security needs and protective services in courthouses, as identified by the U.S. Marshals Service.

Additionally, the bill extends temporary judgeships in several districts.

District of Columbia – The bill includes a total of $762.1 million, an increase of $47.8 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $8.8 million above the President’s budget request.

  • $40 million for D.C. Resident Tuition Support, reversing the elimination of the program proposed by the Administration.
     
  • $4 million, an increase of $1 million above the President’s request, for HIV/AIDS Testing and Treatment to help prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS in the District of Columbia.
     
  • $8 million, equal to the FY 2020 enacted level, to fund infrastructure improvements for the D.C. Water and Sewer Authority.

In addition, the bill removes objectionable policy riders previously carried that intrude on home rule in the District of Columbia:

  • Eliminates a ban on the use of local funds for abortion services;
     
  • Eliminates a ban on the use of local funds to legalize marijuana;
     
  • Eliminates a ban on the use of funds for needle exchange programs; and
     
  • Eliminates a provision appropriating local District funds.

The bill also restricts the President’s ability to federalize the District of Columbia Metropolitan Police Department.

Independent Agencies:

  • Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) – The bill funds the CPSC at $137 million, an increase of $4.5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $2 million above the President’s request. Within the total, $1.3 million is provided for Virginia Graeme Baker Pool Safety grants.
     
  • Election Assistance Commission (EAC) – The bill provides $500 million for Election Security Grants, an increase of $75 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to augment State efforts to improve the security and integrity of elections for Federal office. In addition, $19.1 million is included for EAC operating expenses, an increase of $3.9 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $6 million above the President’s budget request. 
     
  • Federal Communications Commission (FCC) – The bill includes $376.1 million for the FCC, an increase of $37.1 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. This includes funding to implement new broadband mapping legislation. Additionally, the bill includes $61 billion in emergency funding for the FCC to expand availability of broadband to unserved areas, as well as multi-year funding for broadband mapping and replacement of telecommunications equipment deemed to pose a national security threat to the United States.
  • Federal Trade Commission (FTC) – The bill includes $341 million for the FTC, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to bolster antitrust and consumer protection work. 
  • General Services Administration (GSA) Federal Buildings Fund (FBF) The bill includes $9.1 billion in spending authority for the FBF. The total funding level includes:
     
    • $201 million for Washington, DC Department of Homeland Security Consolidation at St. Elizabeths;
    • $9 million for Washington, DC Southeast Federal Center Remediation;
    • $586 million for Repairs and Alterations; and
    • Additionally, the bill provides $6 billion for land port of entry modernization, construction, repairs and alterations to Federal buildings, and administrative support for portfolio management.
       
  • National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) The bill provides $361.5 million for NARA operating expenses, an increase of $2.5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $4.5 million above the President’s request. Of this amount, $2 million is provided for implementation of the Civil Rights Cold Case Record Collections Act of 2018. In addition, the bill includes $7 million for the National Historical Publications & Records Commission Grants Program.
     
  • Office of Personnel Management (OPM) – The bill includes $339 million, an increase of $8.5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for OPM to manage and provide guidance on Federal human resources and administer Federal retirement and health benefit programs.
  • Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) – The bill includes $1.92 billion, an increase of $105 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for SEC salaries and expenses. The bill also provides funding for move costs related to the SEC’s headquarters and San Francisco regional offices.
     
  • Small Business Administration (SBA) – The bill provides a total of $939.4 million for SBA, an increase of $200.4 million above the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes $277 million, an increase of $16 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $109.4 million above the President’s request, for Entrepreneurial Development Programs, including:
     
    • $140 million for Small Business Development Centers;
       
    • $35 million for Microloan Technical Assistance;
       
    • $20.5 million for the State Trade Expansion Program; and
       
    • $24.5 million for Women’s Business Centers.

Policy Provisions –

  • Federal Employment for DACA Recipients – Includes new language making DACA recipients eligible for Federal employment.
     
  • Federal Worker Protections – Includes a new provision prohibiting Federal agencies from imposing new union contracts that were not agreed to through good faith collective bargaining negotiations.
     
  • Implementation of Social Media EO – Includes new language blocking the FTC and FCC from needlessly expending resources implementing an executive order on online platforms before Congress completes its work in this area.
     
  • Blocks OPM Merger with GSA Includes new language rejecting the Administration’s proposed merger of OPM with GSA.
     
  • Commission on Federal Naming and DisplaysIncludes a new provision that creates a commission to identify and recommend name changes or removal of Federal property that is inconsistent with the values of diversity, equity, and inclusion.
  • Campaign Finance Transparency – Eliminates three provisions that limit transparency into political spending.
  • Apportionment Transparency – Includes a new provision requiring OMB to make apportionments of appropriations publicly available in a timely manner.
  • GAO Responsiveness to Congress – Includes new provisions requiring executive agencies to provide information to the Government Accountability Office promptly.
  • Improvements in Budget Execution – Includes a new provision that requires budget authority be made available prudently for obligation.

Border Wall – Includes a provision to prohibit the use of funds from the Treasury Forfeiture Fund for the construction of the President’s border wall.

Division F – Labor-HHS-Education

Overview:

The Labor-HHS-Education bill includes funding for programs within the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and other related agencies, including the Social Security Administration.

The LHHS bill supports some of the nation’s most critical programs that touch individuals and families throughout their lifespan, from Early Head Start to Social Security. The bill continues to invest in programs that provide opportunities for millions of families, so that every individual has a better chance at a better life – with a good education, a good job, and access to affordable health care.

For fiscal year 2021, the draft bill includes $196.5 billion in overall funding, an increase of $2.4 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $20.8 billion above the President’s 2021 budget request after accounting for offsets and adjustments.

In addition, to rebuild this nation’s aged public health infrastructure, the bill provides $24.425 billion in emergency spending. This funding will support State and local public health departments, public health laboratories, and global health activities, which is critical to national resilience from this and future public health threats. The bill also includes contingency funding to help States meet unanticipated unemployment insurance workloads.

Bill Summary:

Department of Labor (DOL) – The bill provides a total of $12.7 billion in discretionary appropriations for DOL, an increase of $254 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $1.6 billion above the President’s budget request.  Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • $10.2 billion for the Employment Training Administration, an increase of $187 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $1.5 billion above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
    • $2.9 billion for Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act State Grants, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and President’s budget request.
    • $96 million for Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers, an increase of $4 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposes to eliminate this program.
    • $103 million for the Reintegration of Ex-Offenders, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $10 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $185 million for Registered Apprenticeships, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $15 million below the President’s budget request. The bill rejects the Administration’s proposal to fund Industry Recognized Apprenticeship Programs and continues language allowing funds only to support Registered Apprenticeships.
    • $101 million for YouthBuild, an increase of $6 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $16 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $50 million, an increase of $10 million over the FY 2020 enacted level, to continue and expand Strengthening Community College Training Grants to help meet local and regional labor market demand for a skilled workforce by providing training to workers in in-demand industries at community colleges and four-year partners. The President’s budget request proposes to eliminate this program.
    • $1.76 billion for Job Corps, an increase of $12 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $740 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $410 million for the Senior Community Service Employment for Older Americans Program, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposed to eliminate this program.
    • $2.6 billion for operation of the Unemployment Insurance program, an increase of $109 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request. The bill also includes $925 million in emergency contingency funding to help States address spikes in unemployment claims.
    • $78 million for Foreign Labor Certification, an increase of $9 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $2 million below the President’s budget request. Funds will help support Federal oversight and enforcement of regulations and assist States in reviewing and conducting oversight of processing applications.
  • $1.7 billion for Worker Protection Agencies, an increase of $15 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $5 million below the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
    • $246 million for the Wage and Hour Division, an increase of $4 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $2 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $594 million for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, an increase of $12 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $17 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $42 million for the Office of Labor-Management Standards, a decrease of $1 million below the FY 2020 enacted level and $8 million below the President’s budget request.
  • $15 million for the Women’s Bureau, an increase of $1 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $12 million above the President’s budget request. 
  • $58 million for the Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program, an increase of $3 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and the President’s budget request.

Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) – The bill provides a total of $96.4 billion for HHS, an increase of $1.5 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $11.1 billion above the President’s budget request.

  • National Institutes of Health (NIH) – The bill provides a total of $47 billion for NIH, an increase of $5.5 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level. The bill provides $42 billion in annual appropriations, an increase of $500 million above the 2020 enacted level and $8.6 billion above the President’s budget request, as well as $5 billion in emergency appropriations.
    • The bill increases funding for each Institute and Center by no less than 7 percent to support a wide range of critical research on diseases and conditions that affect individuals and families all over the world.
    • Additionally, the bill provides targeted investments in several high-priority areas, including:
      • $5 billion in emergency funding to improve capacity at research institutions;
      • $240 million for Universal Flu Vaccine Research, an increase of $40 million above the FY 2020 enacted level;
      • $3.1 billion for HIV/AIDS research, an increase of $37 million above the FY 2020 enacted level;
      • $2.9 billion for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias research, an increase of $35 million above the FY 2020 enacted level;
      • $65 million for the INCLUDE Down syndrome research initiative, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level;
      • $25 million for firearm injury and mortality prevention research, an increase of $12.5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level;
      • $80 million for Research Centers in Minority Institutions, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level;
      • $397 million for Institutional Development Awards, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level; and
      • Continued robust investments in initiatives such as the Cancer Moonshot, All of Us Precision Medicine Initiative, BRAIN Initiative, Opioids research, combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and Clinical and Translational Science Awards.
         
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – The bill includes a total of $8 billion for CDC, an increase of $232 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, not including a one-time transfer in 2020 from the Nonrecurring Expenses Fund, and $925 million above the President’s budget request. This includes $856 million in transfers from the Prevention and Public Health Fund.

In addition, the bill includes $9 billion in emergency supplemental appropriations for CDC to improve the nation’s preparedness for public health emergencies.

  • The bill includes $25 million, an increase of $12.5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to specifically support firearm injury and mortality prevention research.
  • The bill includes significant investments in our nation’s public health infrastructure including:
    • $50 million for the multi-year effort to modernize public health data surveillance and analytics at CDC, State and local health departments, and the National Center for Health Statistics.
    • $56 million, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, in public health workforce initiatives.
    • $700 million, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for public health emergency preparedness cooperative agreements.
    • $363 million, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for epidemiologic and laboratory support at State and eligible public health agencies.
  • The bill provides increases for numerous public health efforts, including:
    • $65 million, an increase of $2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for food safety.
    • $240 million, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to address tobacco and e-cigarettes.
    • $150 million, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level to support CDC’s efforts to reduce new HIV infections by 90 percent in 10 years.
    • $30 million, an increase of $3 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for the Diabetes Prevention Program.
    • $67 million, an increase of $7 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for the only Federal program addressing the nation’s racial and ethnic health disparities, Racial and Ethnic Approach to Community Health (REACH), including $23 million, an increase of $2 million, for Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country.
    • $68 million, an increase $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for safe motherhood.
    • $15 million, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for the health impacts of climate change.
    • $10 million for a new effort focused on social determinates of health.
    • $10 million for a new effort focused on healthy aging.
    • $10 million to continue the Flint, Michigan Lead Exposure Registry.
    • $2 million, an increase of $1 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for child sexual abuse prevention.
    • $7.5 million, an increase of $2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for domestic violence prevention.

The bill includes $9 billion in emergency supplemental funding for the following public health and emergency response activities:

  • $4 billion for enhanced public health prevention efforts, including an influenza vaccination campaign.
  • $2 billion for Public Health Emergency Preparedness cooperative agreements to increase State and local public health emergency response capabilities.
  • $1 billion to improve capabilities at State and local public health laboratories.
  • $1 billion to strengthen global public health preparedness and response capacity.
  • $400 million for the multi-year effort to modernize public health data surveillance and analytics.
  • $400 million for the Infectious Diseases Rapid Response Reserve Fund.
  • $200 million for public health workforce development, including the doubling of the Epidemic Intelligence Service fellowship program.
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) – The bill funds SAMHSA at $6 billion – an increase of $96 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $238 million above the President’s budget request. SAMHSA funding includes increased support for:
    • Mental health resources for children and youth including $107 million for Project AWARE, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level; and $72 million for the National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative, an increase of $3 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.
    • Suicide prevention including $21 million for the Zero Suicide program, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level; and $21 million for the Suicide Lifeline, an increase of $2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.
    • $35 million for a new set-aside in the mental health block grant to support mental health crisis systems.
    • Substance use treatment: $3.8 billion, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, including continued funding for opioid prevention and treatment, recovery and tribal-focused treatment efforts.
    • Substance abuse prevention: $209 million, an increase of $3 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.
       
  • Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) – The bill includes $7.2 billion for HRSA, an increase of $159 million above the 2020 enacted level and $907 million above the President’s budget request. The amount includes:
    • $1.65 billion, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for the Health Centers program, including $10 million to support school-based health centers;
    • $2.4 billion, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for the Ryan White HIV/AIDS program;
    • $65 million in Health Centers and $95 million in the Ryan White HIV/AIDS program for the Domestic HIV/AIDS Initiative;
    • $1.2 billion, an increase of $48 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for HRSA’s Bureau of Health Professions programs to support the medical workforce;
    • $981 million, an increase of $37 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for programs to improve maternal and child health, including an additional $25 million for the Maternal and Child Health Block Grant;
    • $334 million, an increase of $16 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for Rural Health Programs, including increases for telehealth and rural hospitals; and
    • $33 million, an increase of $5.5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for Organ Transplantation to expand support for living organ donors.
       
  • Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) – The bill provides $343 million for AHRQ, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.
     
  • Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) – The bill provides $4 billion for CMS administrative expenses, an increase of $315 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $291 million above the President’s budget request. This funding level includes an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level for State Survey and Certification activities to support additional health and safety inspections of nursing home facilities.

The bill also directs CMS to use $100 million in carryover funds from ACA user fees to support the ACA Navigators program, as well as outreach, enrollment, and advertising during the ACA open enrollment period.

  • Administration for Children and Families (ACF) – The bill provides $24.8 billion in discretionary funding for ACF, an increase of $317 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $4.6 billion above the President’s budget request.
    • Early childhood programs receive an increase of $275 million above the FY 2020 enacted level:
  • $5.9 billion for the Child Care and Development Block Grant, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2020 enacted level;
  • $10.8 billion for Head Start, an increase of $150 million above the FY 2020 enacted level; and
  • $300 million for Preschool Development Grants, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  
    • $3.8 billion for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.
    • $750 million for the Community Services Block Grant, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. 
    • $193 million for Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act programs, an increase of $12.5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.
  • Administration for Community Living (ACL) – The bill funds ACL at $2.3 billion, an increase of $56 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $171 million above the President’s budget request. This amount includes:
    • $957 million for Senior Nutrition programs, an increase of $20 million above the FY 2020 enacted level;
    • $400 million for Home and Community-based Supportive Services, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level; and
    • $206 million for Family and Native American Caregivers Services, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.
  • Office of the Secretary—General Departmental Management – The bill provides $523 million, a reduction of $22 million below the FY 2020 enacted level and an increase of $102 million above the President’s budget request. The amount includes:
    • $101 million for the Teen Pregnancy Prevention program, equal to the FY 2020 enacted level.
    • $65 million for the Office of Minority Health, an increase of $6 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.
    • $57 million for the Minority HIV/AIDS Initiative, an increase of $3 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.
    • $37 million for the Office on Women’s Health, an increase of $3 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.
    • $5 million for KidneyX, equal to the FY 2020 enacted level, for a public-private partnership to accelerate the development and adoption of novel therapies and technologies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of kidney diseases.
    • No funding for abstinence-only education.
  • Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund (PHSSEF) – The bill provides $2.8 billion for PHSSEF, an increase of $90 million above the FY 2020 level and $186 million above the President’s budget request.

In addition, the bill includes $4.5 billion in emergency supplemental appropriations for BARDA to support advanced research and development and advanced manufacturing of vaccines and therapeutics to improve the nation’s preparedness for public health emergencies.

  • $300 million, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for Hospital Preparedness Program formula grants.
  • $310 million, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for pandemic influenza.
  • $10 million for pediatric disaster care.
  • $5 million for a new effort to support the implementation of the National Biodefense Strategy.
  • $562 million for the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), equal to the FY 2020 enacted and the President’s budget request.
  • $735 million for Project BioShield, equal to the FY 2020 enacted level and $200 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $705 million for the Strategic National Stockpile, equal to the FY 2020 enacted and the President’s budget request.
  • At least $11 million for the National Emerging Special Pathogen Training and Education Center (NETEC) and 10 existing regional Ebola and other special pathogen treatment centers.

The bill includes emergency supplemental funding to support advanced research, development, manufacturing, production, and purchase of vaccines and therapeutics; enhancements to domestic vaccine production facilities; and innovation in antibacterial research and development:

  • $3.5 billion for Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) to support advanced research and development, and advanced manufacturing of vaccines and therapeutics.
  • $500 million for BARDA to support and promote innovation in antibacterial research and development.
  • $500 million for BARDA to support U.S.-based next generation vaccine manufacturing facility enhancements.

Public Health Emergency Fund – The bill provides $5 billion to deposit in a permanent emergency fund to ensure the Department of Health and Human Services is able to respond quickly and aggressively to a broad range of public health threats and protect the American people.

Department of Education (ED) – The bill provides a total of $73.5 billion in discretionary appropriations for ED, an increase of $716 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $6.9 billion above the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • $16.6 billion for Title I Grants to Local Educational Agencies, an increase of $254 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. The President’s budget proposes to eliminate this program.
  • $14.1 billion for Special Education, an increase of $208 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $108 million above the President’s budget request. The amount includes:
    • $13 billion for Part B Grants to States, an increase of $194 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $94 million above the President’s budget request, and
    • $25 million for Special Olympics education programs, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
       
  • $2.2 billion for Supporting Effective Instruction State Grants (Title II-A), an increase of $23 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget proposes to eliminate this program.
     
  • $797 million for English Language Acquisition, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. The President’s budget proposes to eliminate this program.
     
  • $1.2 billion for Student Support and Academic Enrichment State Grants, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget proposes to eliminate this program.
     
  • $1.3 billion for Nita M. Lowey 21st Century Community Learning Centers, an increase of $13 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget proposes to eliminate this program.
     
  • $400 million for the Charter School Program, $40 million below the FY 2020 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposes to eliminate this program.
     
  • $85 million, an increase of $20 million over the FY 2020 enacted level, for grants to expand opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM), including computer science within the Education Innovation and Research program. The President’s budget proposes to eliminate this program.
     
  • $172 million for a Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) Initiative to support SEL and “whole child” approaches to education. Within this amount, the bill provides:
    • $110 million, an increase of $45 million over the FY 2020 enacted level, for grants for evidence-based, field-initiated innovations that address student social, emotional, and cognitive needs within the Education Innovation and Research program. The President’s budget proposes to eliminate this program;
    • $22 million to continue funding for grants within the Supporting Effective Educator Development (SEED) program with a priority for teacher professional development and pathways into teaching that provide a strong foundation in child development and learning, including skills for implementing SEL strategies. The President’s budget proposes to eliminate this program;
    • $10 million within the School Safety National Activities program to continue funding for grants that will make schools safer by helping LEAs directly increase the number of mental health and child development experts in schools. The President’s budget proposes to eliminate this program; and
    • $30 million, an increase of $5 million over the FY 2020 enacted level, for Full-Service Community Schools to provide comprehensive services and expand evidence-based models that meet the holistic needs of children, families, and communities. The President’s budget proposes to eliminate this program.
       
  • Career, Technical and Adult Education—The bill provides $2 billion for Career, Technical and Adult Education, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $738 million below the President’s budget request. This amount includes:
    • $1.3 billion for CTE State Grants, an increase of $18 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $662 million below the President’s budget request, and
    • $664 million for Adult Education State Grants, an increase of $7 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
       
  • Student Financial Assistance— The bill provides $24.6 billion for Federal student aid programs, an increase of $45 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $1.6 billion above the President’s budget request.  Within this amount, the bill provides:
    • $6,495 for the maximum Pell Grant, an increase of $150 above the FY 2020 enacted level and the President’s budget request.  The increase will help the maximum award keep pace with inflation.
    • $880 million for the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant program, an increase of $15 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposes to eliminate this program.
    • $1.2 billion for Federal Work Study, an increase of $30 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $710 million above the President’s budget request.
       
  • Higher Education— The bill provides $2.6 billion for higher education programs, an increase of $81 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $768 million above the President’s budget request. 
    • Within this amount, the bill provides $808 million, an increase of $49 million over the FY 2020 enacted level and $156 million over the President’s budget request, to assist primarily Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) in the Aid for Institutional Development account, including:
      • $344 million for Historically Black Colleges and Universities, an increase of $19 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
      • $155 million for Hispanic Serving Institutions, an increase of $12 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. The President’s budget proposes to consolidate this and other MSI programs into a single MSI grant program, which the bill rejects.
      • $39 million for Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities, an increase of $2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
    • The bill also provides investments in the following higher education programs:
      • $1.1 billion for Federal TRIO programs, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $150 million above the President’s budget request.
      • $370 million for GEAR UP, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget proposes to consolidate the program into the TRIO programs.
      • $52 million for Teacher Quality Partnerships, an increase of $2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. The President’s budget request proposes to eliminate this program.
      • $55 million for the Child Care Access Means Parents in School, an increase of $2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $40 million above the President’s budget request.
      • $31 million for the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, an increase of $6.5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. The President’s budget proposes to eliminate this program. This amount includes:
        • $7 million to continue the Centers of Excellence for Veteran Student Success Program to provide student veterans a one-stop-shop for academic support, networking opportunities, peer mentorship, financing assistance, counseling, and career services.
        • $7 million to continue the Open Textbook Pilot program to support the creation and expand the sustainable use of quality open college textbooks.
        • $7 million to promote the study of modeling and simulation at institutions of higher education, specifically to promote the use of technology in such study through the creation of accurate models that can simulate processes or recreate real life.
        • $5 million for a Basic Needs Grants pilot to help support college students achieve academic success by meeting their basic needs, such as housing, food, transportation, and access to physical and mental health.
        • $2 million for the operation of the National Center for Information and Technical Support for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities.
        • $2 million for a Center of Educational Excellence to help HBCUs increase the number of Black teachers.
        • $1 million to help support gang-involved youth transition to higher education.

Related Agencies –

  • $1.2 billion for the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), an increase of $50 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget proposes to eliminate CNCS. 
    • Within the total amount, the bill includes:
      • $239 million for Senior Corps programs, an increase of $18 million over the FY 2020 enacted level. 
      • $447 million for AmeriCorps, an increase of $18 million over the FY 2020 enacted level.
      • $35 million for National Civilian Community Corps, an increase of $2 million over the FY 2020 enacted level.
         
  • $515 million for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), in 2023 advance funding, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2022 enacted level.  In addition, the bill includes $20 million for the interconnection system and system wide infrastructure, equal to the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposes to eliminate the CPB.
     
  • $257 million for the Institute of Museum and Library Services, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposes to eliminate IMLS.
     
  • $278 million for the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), an increase of $4 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $31 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes $1 million and new bill language for the NLRB to establish and administer a process for electronic voting.
     
  • $13 billion for the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) operating expenses, with an increase of $100 million above the FY 2020 enacted level to hire additional staff at field offices, teleservice and processing centers and improve public services. 

Policy Provisions

Bolstering Pandemic Response

  • Strategic National Stockpile—The bill includes a new provision requiring a weekly report on the inventory of ventilators and personal protective equipment in the Strategic National Stockpile, as well as an annual professional judgment budget for necessary expenditures to maintain the minimum level of relevant supplies, including in the case of a pandemic.

Supporting Affordable Health Care

  • ACA Navigators—The bill directs CMS to use at least $100 million of carryover ACA user fees to support the ACA Navigators program, as well as outreach, enrollment, and advertising during the ACA open enrollment period.
  • Medicaid Non-Emergency Medical Transportation—The bill includes a new provision prohibiting funds from being used to publish a proposed regulation to limit the Medicaid non-emergency medical transportation benefit for Medicaid beneficiaries.

Protecting Migrants

  • Memorandum of Agreement—The bill includes a provision to prohibit any funding from being used to implement or enforce the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Office of Refugee Resettlement and the Department of Homeland Security that shares sponsor information with ICE for the purposes of immigration enforcement.
  • Influx Shelters—The bill prohibits funds from being used to house unaccompanied children in the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement in influx shelters that are not State-licensed for the care of unaccompanied children.
  • Congressional Oversight—The bill includes a modification of the FY 2020 enacted provision relating to Members of Congress and oversight of facilities responsible for the care of unaccompanied alien children.
  • Counseling Sessions—The bill prohibits the sharing of information provided by unaccompanied children during mental health or therapeutic services with the Department of Homeland Security or the Department of Justice for immigration enforcement.

Defending Reproductive Health Care

  • Title X Family Planning—The bill includes language to override the Administration’s gag order and restore grant eligibility to Planned Parenthood and other health clinics that offer the full range of reproductive health services.
  • Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program (TPPP)—The bill includes new language to ensure that TPPP grantees offer medically accurate, complete, and age-appropriate programs, as required by statute.

Protecting Workers Rights

  • Home Health Workers—The bill includes a new provision to block the Administration’s regulation to prevent unionized home health workers from using a payroll deduction to pay their union dues.
  • Joint Employer—The bill includes new provisions prohibiting funds from implementing Department of Labor and National Labor Relation Board rules that allow corporations not to be liable for wages and working conditions at their franchisees or contractors.
  • Merit Staffing—The bill includes a new provision prohibiting the use of funds to implement a final rule that would privatize job search functions and other essential services offered through the Employment Service system.

Protecting Civil Rights

  • Protections for the LGBTQ Community—The bill includes a new provision to block the Administration’s new regulation that would allow discrimination in health and health education programs against individuals based on LGBTQ status.
  • Preventing Discrimination in Foster Care—The bill includes a new provision prohibiting funds from being awarded to a foster care organization that does not comply with nondiscrimination regulations related to age, disability, sex, race, color, national origin, religion, gender identity, or sexual orientation.
  • School Desegregation—The bill includes language eliminating a 46-year-old education authorizing statute provision that prohibits funds from being used to address school segregation.
  • Title IX—The bill includes a new provision prohibiting funds from implementing the final Title IX regulation regarding how schools respond to sexual assault and harassment and that disproportionately burdens complainants.

Expanding Opportunity and Ensuring Accountability in Education

  • Second Chance Pell—The bill includes new language allowing incarcerated individuals to be eligible for Pell Grants.
  • For-Profit College Accountability—The bill includes new language requiring for-profit colleges to derive more of their revenue from non-Federal sources and includes all Federal education assistance in the calculation.

Supporting People with Disabilities

  • Continuing Disability Reviews—The bill includes a new provision prohibiting the Social Security Administration from finalizing or implementing a new rule that would significantly increase the number and frequency of CDRs, cutting benefits to Social Security and SSI disabled beneficiaries.   
  • Administrative Law Judges—The bill includes a new provision prohibiting the Social Security Administration from finalizing or implementing a proposed rule that would replace an individual’s right to appeal their denied application for Social Security or SSI benefits before an independent Administrative Law Judges at a hearing, with an appeal before an SSA staff attorney.

Helping Reduce Injection-Related Infections to Save Lives

  • Syringe Exchange—The bill removes a longstanding general provision that prohibited federal funds from being used to purchase syringes as part of a public health campaign to provide services to individuals involved in injection drug use.

Division G – Transportation-Housing and Urban Development

Overview:

The Transportation-Housing and Urban Development bill funds the Department of Transportation, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and other related agencies, including the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness.

For fiscal year 2021, the legislation provides $158.3 billion in base budgetary resources. The bill includes $75.9 billion in discretionary funding, an increase of $1.7 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $16.8 billion above the President’s 2021 budget request. Consistent with the INVEST in America Act, the bill includes budgetary resources for surface transportation programs totaling $78.7 billion. In addition, the legislation provides $75 billion to support the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic by investing in our nation’s transportation and housing infrastructure.

Bill Summary:

Department of Transportation (DOT)— For fiscal year 2021, the bill provides a total of $107.2 billion in total budgetary resources for DOT – an increase of $21.1 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $19.4 billion above the President’s 2021 budget request.  Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • $1 billion for National Infrastructure Investments (TIGER/BUILD), equal to the FY 2020 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
     
  • $3 million to support the Highly Automated Systems Safety Center of Excellence established in fiscal year 2020.  This program was not in the President’s budget request.
     
  • $10 million for Transportation Planning Grants to assist areas of persistent poverty.  This new competitive grant program was not in the FY 2020 enacted bill or the President’s budget request.
     
  • $18.1 billion for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), an increase of $522 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $618 above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $1.5 billion for Aviation Safety, an increase of $96 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $26 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $500 million for discretionary Airport Improvement Grants, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $500 million above the President’s budget request. 
     
  • $62.9 billion for the Federal Highway Administration:
     
    • $61.9 billion, consistent with the INVEST in America Act, for programs funded from the Highway Trust Fund, an increase of $14.7 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $11.1 billion above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $1 billion for discretionary Highway Infrastructure Programs, a decrease of $1.2 billion below the FY 2020 enacted level and $1 billion above the President’s budget request. 
       
  • $886 million for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, consistent with the INVEST in America Act, an increase of $207 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $184 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $1.3 billion for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, consistent with the INVEST in America Act, an increase of $268 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $293 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $3 billion for the Federal Railroad Administration, an increase of $201.8 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $1 billion above the President’s budget request. 
     
    • $500 million for Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements, an increase of $175 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $170 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $200 million for Federal-State Partnership for State of Good Repair, equal to the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
       
    • $2.05 billion for Amtrak, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $1.1 billion above the President’s budget request. 
       
      • $750 million for Northeast Corridor Grants, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $424.5 million above the President’s budget request.
         
      • $1.3 billion for National Network Grants, equal to the FY 2020 enacted level and $689 million above the President’s budget request.
         
  • $18.9 billion for the Federal Transit Administration:
     
    • $15.9 billion, consistent with the INVEST in America Act, for Transit Formula Grants funded from the Highway Trust Fund, an increase of $5.8 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $4.9 billion above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $2.2 billion for Capital Investment Grants, equal to the authorized level, an increase of $197 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, and $286 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $510 million for Transit Infrastructure Grants, equal to the FY 2020 enacted level and $510 million above the President’s budget request. 
       
  • $40 million for the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation, an increase of $2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $9.3 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $1.2 billion for the Maritime Administration, an increase of $197.3 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $506.7 million above the President’s budget request.
     
    • $314 million for the Maritime Security Program, an increase of $14 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.  In addition, Section 171 of the bill provides an additional $500,000 in fiscal year 2021 for each vessel in the program.
       
    • $300 million for the Port Infrastructure Development Program, an increase of $75 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
       
    • $389 million for schoolship construction, an increase of $89 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $89 million above the President’s budget request.

In addition, to support the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, the bill provides an additional $26 billion for the Department of Transportation programs to strengthen and make more resilient our nation’s aging infrastructure, including:

  • $3 billion for National Infrastructure Investments (TIGER/BUILD);
  • $10.5 million for DOT Cyber Security Initiatives;
  • $500 million for FAA Facilities and Equipment;
  • $2.5 billion for FAA Grants-in-Aid for Airports;
  • $5 billion for Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements;
  • $100 million for Magnetic Levitation Technology Deployment Program;
  • $5 billion for Northeast Corridor Grants to Amtrak;
  • $3 billion for National Network Grants to Amtrak;
  • $5 billion for the Capital Investment Grants;
  • $125 million for Maritime Administration Operations and Training;
  • $345.5 million for State Maritime Academy Operations;
  • $100 million for Assistance to Small Shipyards;
  • $1 billion for Port Infrastructure Development Program; and
  • $7.5 million for the DOT Office of Inspector General.

Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)— For fiscal year 2021, the bill provides a total of $50.6 billion for HUD – an increase of $1.5 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $13.3 billion above the President’s 2021 budget request.  FHA and GNMA receipts for FY 2021 are $10.7 billion, $3.3 billion more than in the FY 2020 enacted bill.  Of the $50.6 billion, the bill includes:

  • $34.8 billion for the Office of Public and Indian Housing, an increase of $2.4 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $6.3 billion above the President’s budget request.
     
    • $25.7 billion for Tenant-based Rental Assistance, an increase of $1.9 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $2.4 billion above the President’s budget request.
       
      • $60 million for housing for homeless veterans, an increase of $20 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  This includes $20 million for the HUD/VA Supportive Housing for Homeless Veterans, which the President’s budget request proposed eliminating, and $40 million in new Incremental Vouchers to Address Homelessness for veterans.
         
      • $2.5 million for HUD/VA Supportive Housing for Homeless Native American Veterans, an increase of $1.5 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program. 
         
  • $3.2 billion for the Public Housing Capital Fund, an increase of $310 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
     
  • $4.6 billion for the Public Housing Operating Fund, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $405 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $250 million for the Choice Neighborhoods Initiative, an increase of $75 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
     
  • $155 million for Self-Sufficiency Programs, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.
     
  • $835 million for Native American Programs, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $235 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $4 million for Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant, an increase of $2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program. 
     
  • $9.1 billion for the Office of Community Planning and Development, an increase of $1.1 billion above the 2020 enacted level and $6 billion above the President’s budget request.
     
    •  $430 million for Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS, an increase of $20 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $100 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    •  $3.5 billion for Community Development Block Grants, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
       
    • $1.7 billion for the HOME Investment Partnership Program, an increase of $350 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
       
    • $45 million for Section 4 Capacity Building, an increase of $9 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
       
    • $3.4 billion for Homeless Assistance Grants, an increase of $638 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $642 million above the President’s budget request.
       
  • $14.6 billion for the Office of Housing, $1 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $854 million above the President’s budget request.
     
    • $13.4 billion for Project-Based Rental Assistance, an increase of $881 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $809 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $893 million for Housing for the Elderly, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $40 million above the President’s budget request.
       
    • $227 million for Housing for Persons with Disabilities, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. 
       
    • $75 million for Housing Counseling, an increase of $22 million above the FY 2020 level and $30 million above the President’s budget request. 
       
  • $118 million for Policy Development and Research, an increase of $20 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $23.4 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $80.3 million for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $15 million above the President’s budget request.
     
  • $340 million for the Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.

In addition, to support the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, the bill provides an additional $49 billion for the Department of Housing and Urban Development programs to bolster communities nationwide by making robust and resilient investments in public housing, affordable housing, and community development, including:

  • $24.25 billion for the Public Housing Capital Fund;
  • $300 million for the CHOICE Neighborhoods Initiative;
  • $1 billion for Native American Programs;
  • $20 million for the Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant;
  • $4 billion for the Community Development Block Grant;
  • $17.5 billion for the HOME Investment Partnerships;
  • $55 million for the Self-Help and Assisted Homeownership Opportunity;
  • $750 million for capital improvements for properties receiving project-based rental assistance;
  • $750 million for the Housing for the Elderly;
  • $179 million for the Housing for Persons with Disabilities;
  • $100 million for the Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes;
  • $100 million for the HUD Cybersecurity and Information Technology Fund; and
  • $7.5 million for the HUD Office of Inspector General.

Related Agencies—The bill provides $432.2 million for the related agencies in the bill, an increase of $62.2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $184 million above the President’s 2021 budget request.

  • $208.5 million for NeighborWorks, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2020 enacted level.  The President’s budget request proposed eliminating this program.
     
  • $3.8 million for the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, equal to the FY 2020 enacted level and the President’s budget request.

In addition, to support recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, the bill provides an additional $300 million for the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation (NeighborWorks) to spur economic stabilization and investment in communities.
 

Policy Provisions

  • Blocks the administration’s public housing rule change targeting undocumented immigrants, which threatens the housing of 55,000 children who are citizens or legal residents.
     
  • Blocks the administration’s proposal to weaken housing protections for LGBT individuals.
     
  • Requires the use of masks and enhanced sanitation measures on airplanes, Amtrak trains, and certain large public transit systems for the duration of the presidentially declared COVID-19 national emergency.
     
  • Extends the period of availability for CDBG-DR funding from the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2013 and provides criteria for waivers of recaptures of funding from disaster survivors.

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116th Congress