Statement : Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies

July 7, 2020 Statement
"So, working together and building on the efforts we have made together thus far, we advance today’s bill, making investments for the nation: for health, for education, and for good-paying, safe and secure jobs, and to address the disparities in these areas that have been exposed by this virus."
July 7, 2020 Statement
"Whether it’s the medical innovations that will lead to cures and vaccines, investments to strengthen public health infrastructure, or support for schools, college affordability, child care, or workplace protections, the bill before us builds on our commitment to invest for the people."
June 4, 2020 Statement
"With many states beginning to re-open, the CDC must remain vigilant to combat the continued increase in cases as well as the expected second wave this fall. The President’s preference of a patchwork for 50 different states fighting covid-19 on their own will not stop these levels of destruction and will lead to more suffering and death. We need a national strategy on testing and tracing, and we need it now."
June 4, 2020 Statement
"We cannot have a CDC that fails to publish high-quality, specific, technical guidance. We cannot have a CDC that has reports shelved, edited, not scientifically driven, or redrafted to suit political purposes. We cannot have a CDC that provides spotty data collection and reporting. We cannot have a CDC that fails at transparency. We need federal leadership that is guided by public health expertise, real-time, rigorous, and transparent. We need CDC and its scientists and public health experts leading the way. And, I am angry that their experience and commitment have been pushed aside for a political agenda."
May 6, 2020 Statement
"I am angry that the White House mismanaged America’s reaction to the pandemic, and the President has done everything he could to avoid accountability. I am particularly upset about the lack of the necessary testing and personal protective equipment capacity. Both of which could help us to regain control."
March 11, 2020 Statement
"Sadly, the Trump Administration has been undermining protections, unions, and workers. And the Trump-controlled NLRB has been taking every opportunity to dismantle workers’ rights to organize. Some of the Board’s most egregious rulings and regulatory efforts seek to deny labor protections for thousands of workers."
March 10, 2020 Statement
"With the recently enacted $8.3 billion emergency supplemental, the federal government can aid state and local health departments in assisting patients and mitigate the extent of the virus. However, due to the Administration’s failure to treat this threat seriously, initial faulty test kits, the Administration’s slow approvals for laboratories, and slow distribution of working kits, more people are likely to be infected. It is imperative that the federal government have a multi-agency approach to ensure tests are available for all who may need one without delay."
March 10, 2020 Statement
"The budget proposes to cut CDC funding by $693 million, or 9 percent, below the FY 2020 appropriation. And, despite the presentation of the President’s Budget, which claims that infectious disease, global health and preparedness were prioritized in CDC’s request, key programs would be cut: the Public Health Data Initiative, the Public Health Workforce program, and the Infectious Diseases Rapid Response Reserve Fund that allowed CDC to quickly respond to COVID-19. This subcommittee will not be pursuing the administration’s proposed cuts. To cut from our public health infrastructure during an outbreak is beyond consideration. Instead, I intend to invest in CDC and our nation’s public health system."
March 4, 2020 Statement
"To propose investing $2 billion for the wall while cutting $3.3 billion from the National Institutes of Health exposes the Trump Administration priorities for what they are: political rhetoric over public health."
March 4, 2020 Statement
"I am proud that the Congress has increased NIH funding by $11.6 billion, or 39 percent, over the past five years. Last year alone, the Congress provided an additional $2.6 billion increase over the fiscal year 2019 level for NIH. Unfortunately, the President’s budget would reverse this progress. The budget proposes to cut NIH funding by $3.3 billion, or 7.9 percent below the fiscal year 2020 level. This would result in NIH making nearly 1,800 fewer new grants to researchers, a reduction of 16 percent. This subcommittee will not be pursuing these cuts. I intend to move forward with continued, increased investments in NIH, to build off of the progress made in recent years."

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